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Thread: Chinese Political, military, economic, weakness.

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    This.

    Hi fellow Taiwanese.

    Quote Originally Posted by RollingWave View Post
    Ehhh

    Military power in the modern era is relative to your economic power, if China's economy do grow to the point where they are on par with the US (and that probably means a significantly higher overall GDP than the US and a GDP per capita that is more inline with the higher end of developing nations .) then it is more than likely that their military capacity will upgrade to a similarly comparable standards as the US. but this hasn't happened yet, and won't happen that quickly baring some unforeseen disastor. (and in that event it probably won't bold that well for China either)

    However, there is certainly a chance that could happen sometime down the line, though that line is more like 50 years from now. as they still have plenty of hurdles to clear .

    Still, if they DO manage to clear all those hurdles then the China of that time won't be the China we known now anyway. there will most likely be signfiicant social and political changes that went along with the economic development, something that IS happening just that it isn't quite as apparent to outsiders.

    Again, I bring out the most logical comparason cases. just look at Taiwan and South Korea, two fellow East Asian country of pretty similar background (was ruled by a militaristic government which focused first on economic improvements) you see a very similar pattern to China of today. and in both cases today both country are modern democratic and economically successful countries.

    China's bigger size will probably make this size slower. but there are still plenty of reasons to believe that this will happen, there are all sorts of incentives for the PRC to make sure their economy move in a good direction , and once that happens there are plenty of reasons to believe it will lead to social and political transitions

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  3. Default oh .. so so true ...

    who sais they aspire to be a superpower? is it declared by the Chinese Communist Government ... ??

    "no navy to do damage" .. mmm .. wasn't it a year or two ago .. that an outdated chinese submarine ... surfaced behind a US Carrier ... whilst being fully protected by all her destroyers and frigates??? .. mocking the US military ... or was this not released to the US public .. since the US government CONTROLS the media ... Oops .. that wouldn't be right would it .. that'll make the US .. to be somewhat communist .. wouldn't it???



    Quote Originally Posted by AF_Commando View Post
    China will never become a super power despite what anyone says. at most they will remain a regional power. why? they have no navy or air force large enough to do damage say in the Americas or Europe or Africa.

    as for the single men either chinas getting real gay or there going to start mail order husbands.

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    Quote Originally Posted by presidiuman View Post
    the US government CONTROLS the media ...


    Obviously it does not. You need to relax a little bit, young fella.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RollingWave View Post
    Ehhh

    Military power in the modern era is relative to your economic power, if China's economy do grow to the point where they are on par with the US (and that probably means a significantly higher overall GDP than the US and a GDP per capita that is more inline with the higher end of developing nations .) then it is more than likely that their military capacity will upgrade to a similarly comparable standards as the US. but this hasn't happened yet, and won't happen that quickly baring some unforeseen disastor. (and in that event it probably won't bold that well for China either)

    However, there is certainly a chance that could happen sometime down the line, though that line is more like 50 years from now. as they still have plenty of hurdles to clear .

    Still, if they DO manage to clear all those hurdles then the China of that time won't be the China we known now anyway. there will most likely be signfiicant social and political changes that went along with the economic development, something that IS happening just that it isn't quite as apparent to outsiders.

    Again, I bring out the most logical comparason cases. just look at Taiwan and South Korea, two fellow East Asian country of pretty similar background (was ruled by a militaristic government which focused first on economic improvements) you see a very similar pattern to China of today. and in both cases today both country are modern democratic and economically successful countries.

    China's bigger size will probably make this size slower. but there are still plenty of reasons to believe that this will happen, there are all sorts of incentives for the PRC to make sure their economy move in a good direction , and once that happens there are plenty of reasons to believe it will lead to social and political transitions
    i dont believe that china will be the likes of south korea or taiwan
    despite militarian, those government in both countries are not doctrinized commu
    i dont think such communist gov will go democratic by their own good will
    also if china goes democracy, will it be the best for them? i dont think so
    so many problems, so vast area, so many opinion
    imo, china's best government form is communist or monarchy
    and they already have it

    one that i know of, one of the big problem is china demographic
    although mostly homogeneous, china still have problems from not so integrated people
    also seeing how the government handle minorities, by do not give them at least cultural protection against han people
    its clearly creates more problems than solution
    it just the problems are buried, but definitely could rise from the dead at anytime

    although i really hope the china could solve their problems
    i mean, country at that size, if they have big problems, all the world will also have troubles
    i think all the world should not be too depended on china or maybe usa or another country, but on their own

    so if any country have problems, their troubles is mininal, not like now when the worlds waits for usa consuming rate, or china cheap product etc
    Humans are identical
    They just do not realize it
    --Miss Marple--

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    "no navy to do damage" .. mmm .. wasn't it a year or two ago .. that an outdated chinese submarine ... surfaced behind a US Carrier ... whilst being fully protected by all her destroyers and frigates???
    I guess we wont know until you provide an actual source for your claim. This is the first I have heard about that.


    or was this not released to the US public
    Gee, you dont say. What a shock. You are presenting "evidence" based on nothing.


    since the US government CONTROLS the media
    Oh the irony, heh heh.

    The Chinese Media is subject to veto by the CCP on a whim. It happens so often it has become a cliche.

    The US media often says things the US government does not want them to say. Some parts of the media base all of their content on criticism of the US government. PBS, MSNBC, CNN...those are just the major ones.

    Not to mention that there are no restrictions here at all on foreign media, which also criticizes the US government a great deal. There are no political opinions that are banned in the US. Anyone can express any opinion they want.

  7. Angry

    China gettin' to be scary...

    Security experts warn on China threat
    Wed, Oct 06, 2010 - IMBALANCE:Experts called for a regional security system and for Taiwan to align itself with the strategic interests of Japan and the US in the face of China’s rise
    An expert on cross-strait relations yesterday emphasized the need for openness and transparency, as well as for the ruling and opposition parties to reach a consensus in formulating government policy on relations with China.

    “There should not be secrecy ... there should be a broad national debate, and nothing should be done until a consensus of both parties is reached about what the ultimate goals are,” said Arthur Waldron, an international relations professor at the University of Pennsylvania.

    Waldron made the remarks during the afternoon session of the International Symposium on 50 Years of US-Japan Security Alliance and the Security of Taiwan organized by the Taiwan National Security Institute and the Taiwan Foundation for Democracy.

    MORE
    See also:

    Congress liable to get tough with China after election...

    New US Congress unlikely to let up on China
    Sat, Oct 09, 2010 - A change of control of the US Congress after next month’s elections might take a harsh spotlight off China’s currency, but direct it to other Chinese trade practices, as well as security issues.
    Under a consensus on the importance and outlines of the US-China relationship, business-friendly Republicans have focused on security concerns and supported free trade. Democrats, backed by organized labor, have emphasized more diplomacy and called for fair trade. In the Nov. 2 election for all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 37 of the 100 seats in the Senate, polls show Republicans appear poised to capture the majority in the House and to make strong gains in the Senate.

    China has not emerged as a specific campaign issue, but in an election fought over Democratic US President Barack Obama’s handling of the economy and high unemployment, lawmakers of both parties will be taking swipes against Chinese policies. In the last official business before they broke for the campaign, the House raised China’s ire by passing, by a vote of 348-79, a law that would treat an undervalued Chinese currency as an unlawful subsidy that could be remedied by duties on selected Chinese goods.

    Ninety-nine Republicans joined 249 Democrats to pass the bill, while five Democrats and 74 Republicans voted no. A Republican party statement accompanying the vote voiced skepticism about pressuring China on the currency, but gave Beijing no quarter on other trade issues. “We all believe that there are more important priorities in our trading relationship, and bigger barriers to US exports than China’s undervalued currency,” the Republicans said. “We are frustrated by China’s continued bad faith and aggressive pursuit of protectionist policies that jeopardize our economic relationship,” they said.

    More http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/worl.../09/2003484969
    Last edited by waltky; Oct 08 2010 at 06:51 PM.
    So here is my suggestion: Forget bombs -- we should drop Obama administration policy makers on Iraq and Syria. That would ensure the ruin of the Islamic State in no time!

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    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    China gettin' to be scary...

    Security experts warn on China threat
    Wed, Oct 06, 2010 - IMBALANCE:Experts called for a regional security system and for Taiwan to align itself with the strategic interests of Japan and the US in the face of China’s rise
    If Taiwan wanted to align itself with the strategic interests of Japan and the US for whatever gains, it had missed the chances at least three times in the past.

    Firstly, during the Korean War of 1950-53 when it could try to attack the mainland’s southeastern flank while the Chinese army was busy helping the North Koreans to fight on the Korean peninsula.

    Secondly, during the Great Leap Forward of 1958-61, when the Chinese economy was in a mess.

    Thirdly during the Cultural Revolution of 1965-68 when there was great social upheaval in China.

    Now when modern China is at the peak of its power since the establishment of communist rule in 1947, it is quite suicidal for Taiwan to align itself with any foreign power. To do so, it will allow itself to become the main battlefield and theatre for any future war and conflict, its people will be caught in the crossfire and become cannon fodder for the interests of foreigners.

    It is not too bad for Taiwan to align itself with the US in any future war with other countries on the American continent. At least it can survive like a fox hiding behind a tiger, and may even be rewarded with a piece of rotten meat after the huge beast does all the fighting and killing.
    "The Palestinian/Israeli issue (more accurately, the conflict between Jews and Muslims) could never be resolved permanently." -- reedak

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    Taiwan has been only too eager to align with the US since 1949. Expecting Taiwan to "attack" the mainland during the Korean War is just beyond ridiculous for many reasons.

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    Irrational nonsense is a waste of time.

  11. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tksensei View Post
    Irrational nonsense is a waste of time.
    As usual, beating a retreat with lame excuse.
    "The Palestinian/Israeli issue (more accurately, the conflict between Jews and Muslims) could never be resolved permanently." -- reedak

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