+ Reply to Thread
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Turkey warns Syria: "The oppressed will win"

  1. #1
    Location: Southeast USA
    Posts: 62,129
    My Latest Mood: Amused

    Default Turkey warns Syria: "The oppressed will win"

    Turkey is right............this will end badly for Assad.

    November 21, 2011 1:24 PM
    Turkey warns Syria: "The oppressed will win"

    ANKARA, Turkey - Turkey warned Syria's president Monday that he cannot continue to oppress his people with tanks and guns forever, even as Syrian soldiers opened fire on at least two buses carrying Turkish citizens, witnesses and officials said.

    The attacks, which wounded two people, appeared to be retaliation for Turkey's mounting criticism of Syrian President Bashar Assad, whose military crackdown on an 8-month-old uprising against his rule has killed nearly 4,000 people.

    "You can only continue with tanks and guns to a certain point, the day will come when you will go," Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said during a speech at an international religion conference in Istanbul. "Sooner or later, the oppressed will win."

    It was not clear whether Erdogan was aware of Monday's attacks on the buses when he delivered the speech. But the Turkish leader has grown increasingly critical of the Syrian regime, and said last week that the world must urgently "hear the screams" from Syria and do something to stop the bloodshed.



    Turkey has allowed Syrian refugees and military defectors to take refuge on its soil, and Syria's political opposition has used Turkey as a place to meet and organize.

    Assad's deepening isolation and the growing calls for his ouster are a severe blow to a family dynasty that has ruled Syria for four decades — and any change to the leadership could transform some of the most enduring alliances in the Middle East and beyond.

    The attacks on the buses carrying Turkish citizens occurred near the central Syrian city of Homs, where opposition to the regime is high.

    One of the bus drivers, Erhan Surmeli, said he was taking 25 butchers back to Turkey from Saudi Arabia following the Muslim festival of Eid Al-Adha, or the feast of sacrifice.

    "We had stopped at a checkpoint," Surmeli told The Associated Press by telephone from a Turkish hospital near the Syrian border. "Syrian soldiers emerged from behind sandbags and cursed Erdogan when we told them we were Turks. Then they suddenly opened fire at the bus."

    The vehicle crossed into Turkey with at least one smashed window, video from the Turkish Dogan news agency showed.

    "We came face to face with death," Ahmet Okkas, a passenger, said by telephone. "They shouted obscenities at us and opened fire."

    Another Turkish citizen, Cemil Karli, was wounded in a separate attack on a second bus, the state-run Anadolu Agency said. That vehicle also crossed into Turkey and Karli was taken to a local hospital, it said.

    "We were traveling in a convoy of eight or nine buses, first we were fired upon from a red car," the agency quoted Karli as saying. "Then others started firing at us."

    "We were shocked. We piled onto each other in the aisle to save our lives," he said. "I was hit in the abdomen and in the leg."

    Syria's uprising has grown increasingly violent in recent months. Army defectors who sided with the revolt have grown bolder in recent weeks, fighting back against regime forces and even attacking military bases and raising fears of a civil war.


    On Sunday, the commander of a group of Syrian army defectors retracted earlier claims that his followers launched an unprecedented attack inside the capital, Damascus, in an embarrassing turnaround for the armed movement.

    Riad al-Asaad (left), a Turkey-based air force colonel who heads the Free Syrian Army, said in a video posted on the group's Facebook page Sunday evening that Assad's government was trying to tarnish the image of the revolution.

    "We did not target the party building in Damascus and we will not target any civilian installation," said al-Asaad, who was wearing his military uniform.

    But al-Asaad did not address why his group had claimed responsibility for the attack hours after Damascus residents reported hearing two loud blasts before dawn Sunday. In a Facebook posting — which had been removed by Monday morning — the FSA had said it fired rocket-propelled grenades at the headquarters of Syria's ruling Baath party.

    There were no apparent damage or injuries.

    Syria has banned most foreign journalists from entering Syria and prevented the media from moving freely in the country, making it nearly impossible to independently confirm events on the ground.

    The Free Syrian Army, which claims to have more than 15,000 defectors in its ranks, is controversial among protesters involved in the uprising. Many in the opposition want the protesters to remain peaceful.

    But the FSA and others say there are limits to a peaceful uprising, and the time has come to meet the regime's tanks, bullets and tear gas with force.

    Read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-...#ixzz1ewpB4uAe

  2. Likes waltky liked this post

  3. #2
    Location: Southeast USA
    Posts: 62,129
    My Latest Mood: Amused

    Default

    Fyi.................

  4. Icon15

    Syrian Army deserters executed...

    Syria unrest: Dozens of army deserters 'gunned down'
    19 December 2011 - Activists say more than 900 people have died while Syria wavered on whether to agree to the Arab plan
    Dozens of army deserters have been shot dead by Syrian troops as they tried to flee their bases and join anti-government protests, reports say. The London-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said more than 70 defectors were gunned down in the north-western Idlib province. The claim has not been independently verified as foreign media are banned from reporting in Syria. Damascus earlier agreed to an Arab League deal to allow monitors in. Syrian Foreign Minister Walid Muallem said the Arab League had accepted amendments demanded by Damascus.

    The Arab League said an advance team of observers would go to Syria this week. In a separate development, the UN General Assembly voted by a strong majority to condemn the Syrian authorities for the crackdown, which has left some 5,000 people dead since the protests against President Bashar al-Assad began in March. The non-binding resolution - passed by a vote of 133 to 11, with 43 abstentions - demanded an immediate end to human rights abuses and called on Damascus to implement the Arab League plan.

    Deal 'amendments'

    On Monday, the Observatory said the deserters were killed in Idlib in heavy machine gunfire as they attempted to flee. The incident was also reported by local activists on the ground in Syria. The Observatory cited wounded survivors who claimed that as many as 70 people had been killed in the province - the main stronghold for army defectors. It also said that at least 13 protesters were killed across Syria on Monday. Separately, three government soldiers were killed in fighting with armed rebels in Idlib, the group said. The Local Co-ordination Committees, a group that organises and documents protests, put Monday's death toll across Syria at 31. The government of President Assad says it is fighting armed gangs, trying to destabilise Syria. The alleged shooting of the deserters came just hours after Damascus finally put its signature to the Arab League deal to deploy observers in Syria.

    After the protocol was signed at the Arab League's headquarters in Cairo, Syrian Foreign Minister Walid Muallem said Damascus had agreed because it wanted help to find a "political solution". "We want to emerge from this crisis and build a safe, modern Syria - a Syria that will be a model of democracy," he said. "The signing of the protocol is the beginning of co-operation between us and the Arab League and we will welcome monitors." He said Syria's sovereignty would be protected because the Arab League had agreed to amendments to the deal, which also calls for all violence to be halted, for the withdrawal of troops from the streets and the release of detainees. The observers would be "free" in their movements and "under the protection of the Syrian government", he added, but would not be allowed to visit sensitive military sites. Mr Muallem said he was confident that the observers would support the government's assertion that "armed terrorist groups" were stirring up trouble, and targeting security personnel and civilians.

    Damascus 'manoeuvring'
    Kinda funny how, instead of a 'sequester', the Wall Street bankers got bailed out.

  5. #4
    Location: Southeast USA
    Posts: 62,129
    My Latest Mood: Amused

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    Syrian Army deserters executed...

    Syria unrest: Dozens of army deserters 'gunned down'
    19 December 2011 - Activists say more than 900 people have died while Syria wavered on whether to agree to the Arab plan
    Oh nuts...... this is just getting worse all the time.........

  6. Icon11

    Guess it's not much of a secret now...

    Obama authorized covert support for Syrian rebels, sources say
    August 1st, 2012 : President Barack Obama has signed a covert directive authorizing U.S. support for Syrian rebels battling President Bashar al-Assad's forces, U.S. officials told CNN on Wednesday.
    The secret order, referred to as an intelligence "finding," allows for clandestine support by the CIA and other agencies. It was unclear when the president signed the authorization for Syria, but the sources said it was within the past several months. The Obama administration has said it will step up its assistance to the opposition in the wake of last month's failure by the U.N. Security Council to agree on tougher sanctions against al-Assad's regime. Exactly what type of support the finding authorizes is also unclear. The Obama administration has ruled out arming the rebels for now, providing only nonlethal assistance, such as communications equipment. Last week, the U.S. Treasury Department approved a license allowing the Washington Syrian Support Group to provide direct financial assistance to the Free Syrian Army. The Washington-based representative of the Free Syrian Army is allowed to conduct financial transactions on the rebel group's behalf but is not allowed to send military equipment.

    During the war in Libya, Obama signed a similar directive authorizing covert assistance for rebels in the battle against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. The Obama administration has resisted arming the opposition, in part, because U.S. officials don't know enough about the rebels. U.S. officials have told CNN that Washington is cooperating with countries that are arming the rebels, including Saudi Arabia and Qatar, to help find groups worthy of aid. Diplomatic sources have also said the United States is providing intelligence on Syrian troop movements, which is then passed to rebel groups. Foreign policy experts on Wednesday urged the Obama administration to increase its support of the armed opposition.

    Testifying before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, Andrew Tabler of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy argued the United States should start arming the Syrian opposition, but only under the right conditions. "At this point, given the direction of the conflict, I think that what we need to do is assess which groups could we and should we arm at what point, and make that decision," Tabler told the Senate panel. "I think that we're actually at that decision, given where the conflict is going." James Dobbins of the Rand Corporation agreed. "The time has come to consider and pick those groups that are most consistent with our interest and our vision for the future and begin to advantage them in terms of the internal politics, by providing assistance, including perhaps money as well as arms and advice," Dobbins said.

    Martin Indyk, a former U.S. ambassador to Israel now with the Brookings Institution, recommended arming the opposition, but in a "wise way." "We need to do it in a way that, first of all, we understand who we're supporting and what their intentions are," Indyk said. The State Department said Wednesday the United States has set aside $25 million for "nonlethal" assistance to the Syrian opposition, with another $64 million in humanitarian assistance for the Syrian people. The humanitarian aid, which includes funding for the World Food Programme, the International Committee of the Red Cross and other aid agencies, helps support the tens of thousands of refugees streaming across Syria's borders to neighboring Turkey and Jordan.

    Source
    See also:

    Obama authorizes secret support for Syrian rebels
    WASHINGTON | Wed Aug 1, 2012 - President Barack Obama has signed a secret order authorizing U.S. support for rebels seeking to depose Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his government, sources familiar with the matter said.
    Obama's order, approved earlier this year and known as an intelligence "finding," broadly permits the CIA and other U.S. agencies to provide support that could help the rebels oust Assad. This and other developments signal a shift toward growing, albeit still circumscribed, support for Assad's armed opponents - a shift that intensified following last month's failure of the U.N. Security Council to agree on tougher sanctions against the Damascus government. The White House is for now apparently stopping short of giving the rebels lethal weapons, even as some U.S. allies do just that.

    But U.S. and European officials have said that there have been noticeable improvements in the coherence and effectiveness of Syrian rebel groups in the past few weeks. That represents a significant change in assessments of the rebels by Western officials, who previously characterized Assad's opponents as a disorganized, almost chaotic, rabble. Precisely when Obama signed the secret intelligence authorization, an action not previously reported, could not be determined. The full extent of clandestine support that agencies like the CIA might be providing also is unclear. White House spokesman Tommy Vietor declined comment.

    'NERVE CENTER'

    A U.S. government source acknowledged that under provisions of the presidential finding, the United States was collaborating with a secret command center operated by Turkey and its allies. Last week, Reuters reported that, along with Saudi Arabia and Qatar, Turkey had established a secret base near the Syrian border to help direct vital military and communications support to Assad's opponents. This "nerve center" is in Adana, a city in southern Turkey about 60 miles from the Syrian border, which is also home to Incirlik, a U.S. air base where U.S. military and intelligence agencies maintain a substantial presence. Turkey's moderate Islamist government has been demanding Assad's departure with growing vehemence.

    Turkish authorities are said by current and former U.S. government officials to be increasingly involved in providing Syrian rebels with training and possibly equipment. European government sources said wealthy families in Saudi Arabia and Qatar were providing significant financing to the rebels. Senior officials of the Saudi and Qatari governments have publicly called for Assad's departure. On Tuesday, NBC News reported that the Free Syrian Army had obtained nearly two dozen surface-to-air missiles, weapons that could be used against Assad's helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft. Syrian government armed forces have employed such air power more extensively in recent days. NBC said the shoulder-fired missiles, also known as MANPADs, had been delivered to the rebels via Turkey.

    MORE
    Kinda funny how, instead of a 'sequester', the Wall Street bankers got bailed out.

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    Guess it's not much of a secret now...

    Obama authorized covert support for Syrian rebels, sources say
    August 1st, 2012 : President Barack Obama has signed a covert directive authorizing U.S. support for Syrian rebels battling President Bashar al-Assad's forces, U.S. officials told CNN on Wednesday.


    See also:

    Obama authorizes secret support for Syrian rebels
    WASHINGTON | Wed Aug 1, 2012 - President Barack Obama has signed a secret order authorizing U.S. support for rebels seeking to depose Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his government, sources familiar with the matter said.
    another great example of the leaky security by team Obama


    back to topic the most of mid east is a mess and has been for thousands of years. Romney was right about Palestine, the political culture is why most palestinians live in poverty. Political violence, human rights oppression, sectarianism violence is the norm in many if not most Muslim countries. Turkey isn't too bad, at least they are progressing in most areas
    Last edited by jackdog; Aug 02 2012 at 04:21 AM.
    "America is more than just a place...it's an idea. It's the only country founded on an idea. 'Our rights come from nature and God, not government.' We promise equal opportunity, not equal outcomes." - Paul Ryan

  8. Icon15

    If Iran can interfere, then the least we can do is provide air support for Syrian rebels...

    Iran's intervention in Syria must be stopped
    8/12/2012 - Syria has become a battleground between the Shi’ite and Sunni communities.
    As the situation in Syria continues to deteriorate, with the collapse of the Assad regime becoming increasingly more imminent, further direct intervention by Iran in the Syrian conflict in an effort to save the regime should not be ruled out. For Iran, the Assad regime represents the linchpin of their regional hegemonic ambitions, and as such preserving the regime is central to safeguarding Tehran’s axis of influence, which encompasses Syria, Iraq and Lebanon.

    Direct Iranian involvement in Syria, while a given, further aggravates the already volatile situation in the Middle East. The question is: when will the Western powers led by the US, the Arab states, Turkey and Israel take the necessary and credible steps to force Tehran to stop meddling in Syria’s internal affairs and prevent it from playing a direct role in an effort to quell the Syrian uprising? Having already sent military advisers along with members of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards disguised as pilgrims, and pledging firm support for the Syrian government, it is hard to imagine that Tehran will stay idle in the face of Assad’s imminent demise.

    Should Iran decide to further deepen its involvement in Syria, its decision would be based on long-term considerations rather than the prospect of achieving any immediate advantage. Indeed, from the Iranian perspective, regardless of how the crisis in Syria may unfold, Tehran is determined to maintain its influence, as the loss of Syria would represent a colossal defeat and severely weaken Iran’s hold on the “Shi’ite Crescent” that extends from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean. Whereas until recently Iran tried to obscure its involvement in Syria, in the past few days Iranian lawmakers called on their government to tell the Iranian public why Syria under Assad is of strategic importance. Ahmad Reza Dastgheib, Deputy Head of Iran’s Majlis Committee of National Security and Foreign Policy, said: “We should make all our efforts to prevent the Syrian government from falling.”

    In a further indication of Iran’s concerns over the future of the Assad regime, it has dispatched high-level officials including Saeed Jalili, the head of Iran’s Supreme National Security Council, to assure Assad that Iran will not allow its close partnership with the Syrian leadership to be shaken by the uprising or external foes. Tehran is not convinced, as of yet, that the Western powers (led by the United States) will in fact challenge Iran directly should Iran decide to play a more direct and active role to save both the Assad regime and its larger regional interests. Iran knows that the Western powers and Israel, along with Turkey and the Arab states, would like to pull Syria outside of Iran’s orbit. To persuade Iran that its continuing involvement in Syria is short-lived, the US, the Arab League (AL), the EU and Turkey must work in concert and adopt coercive measures to demonstrate to the Iranian mullahs that this is a no-win situation and that their continued involvement could be disastrous for the regime.

    More http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Op-EdCo...aspx?id=280987
    See also:

    The Next Proxy War
    AUGUST 10, 2012 : How the United States can use the Syrian civil war to prepare the region -- for Iran.
    In a recent op-ed in the Washington Post, Senators John McCain, Lindsey Graham, and Joseph Lieberman argued for stepped-up U.S. intervention in Syria's civil war. They called for providing Syria's rebels with weapons, training, and intelligence. They also called on the United States to support the establishment of safe zones inside Syria, to be protected by U.S. air power and other capabilities (but not American ground troops). Failure to take these steps, they argued, would prolong Syria's bloody civil war, boost the role of Islamic radicals such as al Qaeda, increase the chance that Syria's chemical weapons will end up in dangerous hands, and cause the U.S. to be shut out of the country after the Assad regime falls.

    A key step in formulating effective strategy is confining oneself to realistic and obtainable goals. Significantly shortening Syria's war, determining which factions come out on top, and seizing control of Syria's most threatening weapons in the midst of chaotic combat are goals very likely beyond the grasp of U.S. policymakers, at least at reasonable cost. The senators' rationale for U.S. intervention implies an ability to influence events in Syria beyond what seems feasible. Should U.S. intervention fail to rapidly end the war or quickly seize Syria's chemical weapons, the United States would risk finding itself climbing a ladder of escalation, with increasing use of air power and even ground troops in an effort to achieve the campaign's goals. Once committed in a large and visible way, U.S. prestige would be at risk, forcing policymakers to continue adding resources in the hope of achieving overly ambitious objectives.

    However, that does not mean that the United States should avoid the conflict. In fact, there are important and achievable objectives in Syria, obtainable with little risk and for a modest price. Rather than attempting to influence the course of Syria's civil war, something largely beyond Washington's control, U.S. policymakers should instead focus on strengthening America's diplomatic position and on building irregular warfare capabilities that will be crucial in future conflicts in the region. Modest and carefully circumscribed intervention in Syria, in coordination with America's Sunni allies who are already players in the war, will bolster critical relationships and irregular warfare capabilities the United States and its allies will need for the future.

    The conflict in Syria is just one front in the ongoing competition between Iran and America's Sunni allies on the west side of the Persian Gulf. That competition has played out in the past with proxy warfare in Lebanon and Yemen, and Iraq may become the next surrogate battlefield. Should Iran become a nuclear weapons state, the competition will almost certainly intensify. Regardless of the outcome in Syria, U.S. allies around the Persian Gulf must brace for deepening security competition with Iran.

    More http://www.foreignpolicy.com/article...he_us_on_syria
    Last edited by waltky; Aug 12 2012 at 12:41 PM.
    Kinda funny how, instead of a 'sequester', the Wall Street bankers got bailed out.

  9. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by waltky View Post
    If Iran can interfere, then the least we can do is provide air support for Syrian rebels...

    Iran's intervention in Syria must be stopped

    AUGUST 10, 2012 : How the United States can use the Syrian civil war to prepare the region -- for Iran.
    WarWhacky wants to provide more support for the HATO/Saudi/Israeli terrorists attacking Syria.

    If the Saudis were to take Syria, they would have both Syria and Iraq to attack Iran, then, they could attack Russia, and Europe and America would also fall.

    Congratulations Whahabi USA you are working hard to engineer your forced conversion to Talmudic Islam.
    Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it. (Psalms 34:14)

  10. Icon15

    Big deal - while thousands continue to die in Syria...

    Islamic Bloc Moves to Expel Syria, Leaving Iran Isolated
    August 14, 2012 – A decision by the world’s Islamic nations to expel the Assad regime from its ranks comes as a particular blow to Syria’s closest ally, Iran, and underscores the widening Sunni-Shi’ite rift.
    Iran strongly opposed the call to eject Syria over its violent crackdown, but found little support for its stance Monday as foreign ministers from the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) laid the groundwork for an OIC leaders’ summit, being held in Mecca, Saudi Arabia on Tuesday and Wednesday. The ministers’ recommendation to expel Syria, expected to be formally announced on Wednesday, leaves Iran isolated in the community of Islamic nations, just days before it hoped to enhance its global standing by hosting a summit of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM), a bloc of developing countries.

    Iran had tried to counter the Syria focus by insisting that the OIC summit also deal with the situation in Bahrain, where Iran is backing its Shi’ite brethren in their demand for reforms from the Sunni monarchy that has ruled the small island nation for more than two centuries. Iranian deputy foreign minister Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said Iran wanted leaders of the OIC to address the Syrian and Bahraini crises “simultaneously,” and also to give significant attention to “Palestine.” The Palestinian issue always features prominently at OIC gatherings and this time will be no exception, but Saudi Arabia and the neighboring Gulf states will fend off Tehran’s attempts to push Bahrain up the agenda.

    Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud Al-Faisal said in an address to his OIC counterparts that the summit was being convened “to ward off temptation and address the arising serious risks, including extremism, intolerance, incitement, violence and disintegration of the Islamic nation’s consensus.” (A deputy read out the speech on behalf of Saud, who is convalescing after surgery.) Saudi King Abdullah called the gathering – only the fourth “extraordinary” summit in the OIC’s 43 year-old history – “to examine the situation in many countries of the Islamic world, intensify efforts to confront this situation, address the sources of discord and division therein, reunify the Islamic ummah [community] and promote Islamic solidarity.”

    If anything, the summit seems more likely to enhance Sunni solidarity and entrench the sectarian divide: The Syrian opposition is backed by Sunni powerhouses led by Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar, while President Bashar Assad’s dwindling circle of allies comprise Iran and Hezbollah in Lebanon, with some sympathizers in Iraq’s Shi’ite-led government. Some key Islamic states say they remain neutral; Pakistan, for example, abstained when the U.N. Security Council voted last month on a Syria resolution that was ultimately vetoed by Russia and China.

    MORE
    See also:

    Panetta: Syria no-fly zone not on front burner
    August 14, 2012 WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Leon Panetta says plans to set up a no-fly zone over parts of Syria are "not on the front burner," despite persistent calls from rebel forces there that they need the added protection from escalating regime airstrikes.
    In an interview with The Associated Press on Monday, Panetta said he is confident the U.S. could successfully enforce a no-fly zone over Syria, but doing so would require a "major, major policy decision" that has not yet been made. "We have planned for a number of contingencies that could take place and one of those possible contingencies is developing a no-fly zone. But we've also pointed out difficulties in being able to implement that," Panetta said. "It's not on the front burner as far as I know." Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said recently that Washington and Turkey are discussing a range of steps, and U.S. officials say all options are on the table, including a no-fly zone over some parts of Syria. Rebel leaders have expressed frustration that the United States has limited its assistance to non-lethal aid. A no-fly zone is one in which outside nations prohibit flights over parts of another country and enforce it militarily.

    The U.S. and its NATO allies successfully enforced a no-fly zone over Libya last year, as rebels there made gains and eventually ousted dictator Moammar Gadhafi. Syria, however, has relatively modern air defenses that are far more plentiful and sophisticated than those in Libya. Syria buys its arms from Russia and is backed in its efforts to tamp down the rebels by Iran. Syrian President Bashar Assad's military has significantly stepped up aerial attacks in recent weeks, using missile strikes to push back opposition forces in key fronts such as Aleppo. Civil war has spread across the country, and activists say more than 20,000 people have been killed since the revolt against Assad began in March 2011. Currently, Panetta said, the U.S. is focused on ensuring chemical and biological weapons there are secure and on providing humanitarian and non-lethal assistance to the rebels.

    Panetta, 74, spoke at length on a number of topics during the AP interview in his Pentagon office, with his golden retriever, Bravo, lying at his side and playing with a red stuffed lobster toy. Panetta revealed that Pakistan has told U.S. military officials that it plans to launch combat operations against Taliban militants soon in a tribal area near the Afghan border. The North Waziristan region serves as a haven for leaders of the al-Qaida-linked Haqqani network.

    Pakistan's military chief, Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani, discussed the planned operation with the top American commander in Afghanistan, Gen. John Allen, Panetta said, adding that he understands that it will begin in the "near future." And while he welcomed the operation, he noted that the main target will be the Pakistani Taliban, rather than the Haqqani network. "They've talked about it for a long time. Frankly, I'd lost hope that they were going do anything about it. But it does appear that they in fact are going to take that step," Panetta said.

    MORE
    Kinda funny how, instead of a 'sequester', the Wall Street bankers got bailed out.

  11. Icon15

    Syria makin' Turkey nervous...

    Turkey on pins and needles about Syrian crisis
    14 Aug.`12 - Sees possible opening to compete with Iran for influence
    WASHINGTON – Turkey’s decision to side with Saudi Arabia in the battle to oust Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has caused Ankara to tread lightly, as it sees an opening to extend its own influence in competition with Iran to become the new regional power, according to a report in Joseph Farah’s G2 Bulletin. The results could be not only turning Syria back to a Sunni-run government but additional influence in Iraq, which has a Sunni population but is led by Iranian-backed Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. But Ankara has had to proceed cautiously. It backed off recently when Syria shot down one of its jets that had intruded briefly into Syrian air space.

    As a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan sought to engage the Western alliance to hasten the ouster of Assad. But there was no stomach in NATO to engage Syria in a military confrontation, especially after it became increasingly apparent that the jet had entered Syrian airspace without permission and was shot down over Syrian territorial waters. The Syrian president eventually apologized for the shoot-down, but the political fallout became apparent when Erdogan decided against pursuing the NATO route. As a result, an emboldened Assad has threatened to unleash the Kurd and Alawite minorities that reside in Turkey.

    Now, Turkey is talking about setting up a buffer zone inside Syria with the help of the Turkish military to accommodate Syrian refugee. But officials so far have stopped short of committing the military troops, even though Erdogan has postured by sending Turkish military forces to the border with Syria. Turkey also is being used by the Syrian Free Army opposition to plan and launch attacks against Syrian government forces inside Syria. In addition, Turkey is being used as a source for weapons by the opposition forces in Syria in cooperation with Saudi Arabia and Qatar. This development has prompted Assad to declare that foreign forces are attacking Syria. With that comment, he has opened the prospect of using his arsenal of chemical weapons against them. Now Ankara is looking at what analysts believe is the larger picture of not getting bogged down in one area but looking to extend its influence as a regional power.

    In doing so, however, Ankara is mindful of the prospect of Assad unleashing the Kurdish minority in northern Syria which has linked up with the Democratic Union Party. The DUP is affiliated with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK. For their part, the Kurds in the Turkish southeast sees an opportunity to unite with the Kurds in northern Syria to make a move to set up an independent state called Kurdistan. The area also would include northern Iraq and northern Iran. Turkey, however, doesn’t want to upset Tehran, which has issued a warning to Turkey that it could intervene if it looks like Assad will be ousted, especially if Turkey commits its military.

    Source
    Kinda funny how, instead of a 'sequester', the Wall Street bankers got bailed out.

+ Reply to Thread
+ Post New Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Dec 27 2011, 12:09 AM
  2. Replies: 3
    Last Post: Nov 11 2011, 09:33 AM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks