Astronomers have lost track of nearly 900 asteroids.

Discussion in 'Science' started by cerberus, May 18, 2018.

  1. cerberus

    cerberus Well-Known Member Donor

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    "Astronomers have lost track of nearly 900 asteroids that could be on a deadly collision course with Earth"

    How on earth (no pun intended! :mrgreen: ) could they have lost track of them? I mean, to lose one asteroid may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose nearly 900 looks like carelessness. :roflol: Is there nothing NASA can say that you anoraks won't believe? :wall:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencet...st-track-nearly-900-near-Earth-asteroids.html

     
    Last edited: May 18, 2018
  2. cerberus

    cerberus Well-Known Member Donor

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  3. AlphaOmega

    AlphaOmega Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    If they cant track it why did you accept the science about the speed it was travelling?
     
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  4. cerberus

    cerberus Well-Known Member Donor

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    It's speed isn't cosmological science, it is proven kinetic physics; the question is - at that phenomenal speed, how can anyone expect it to be within passing visual range for more than a few seconds.
     
  5. AlphaOmega

    AlphaOmega Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    How did you calculate the speed of an object in space after you asked how it can be tracked? Im curious to see your science.
     
  6. HonestJoe

    HonestJoe Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    The same reason you can watch jet aircraft flying high overhead even though they’re travelling at hundreds of miles an hour and that you can see stars in the same patch of sky that are many light-years apart. The further the object is away from you, the wider the distance within your field of view.
     
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  7. cerberus

    cerberus Well-Known Member Donor

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    "64,000 mph asteroid was fastest on record"

    https://newatlas.com/sutters-hill-meteor-fastest-kiloton-radar/25552/

    The photo quite clearly shows the asteroid in a 'now you seen it, now you don't' kind of way. So is it any wonder the 'scientists', lost track of it? By the time their radio telescopes locate it again, after it re-emerges into visibility beyond the curvature of the earth, at that speed it would be at least 3 light years away?
     
  8. AlphaOmega

    AlphaOmega Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I clearly asked you how you calculated the speed of an object in space without being able to track it. Please explain
     
  9. Derideo_Te

    Derideo_Te Well-Known Member

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    For STARTERS near earth orbit is NOT "deep space".

    Secondly it is only possible to track the LIGHT REFLECTED from the object. If it passes into a shadow it will effectively "disappear".

    If you look up into the night sky and see a meteor flash can you track where it is going to end up from that single observation? Do you know if it is big enough to survive and hit the earth or will it burn up in the atmosphere or if it is going fast enough to "bounce off" on another trajectory into space?

    In essence these objects are akin to meteor flashes because by the time the alert is given they are already out of visual range for subsequent tracking sightings. You would know this if you had actually bothered to read and understand the article you quoted.

    What this highlights is that we effectively need more telescopes with automatic linking so that when the first telescope records the initial observation the other telescopes will be able to look for it in the probable predicted locations immediately.

    Cosmology is a developing science. We are still learning how to do these things. Why do you fallaciously assume that everything must be working 100% perfectly all of the time when it comes to science?
     
  10. tecoyah

    tecoyah Well-Known Member

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    I have a little experiment for you. Watch an Indy car race on TV to see who wins. Now go to a race track and watch a car go past you.

    Is it easier to see the car from far away than close up?

    Look up in the sky at night during a meteor shower. When you see a shooting star how fast do you think it was going?

    You saw it anyway didn't you.
     
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  11. Right is the way

    Right is the way Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you should put the UKSA on it, I mean they have done so much for the advancement of space travel and have so many discoveries and accomplishments . The UKSA has long glorious history going all the way back to 2010.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2018
  12. jay runner

    jay runner Well-Known Member

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    "Organisations like Nasa track thousands of them to ensure they don't hit Earth." Quoted from the link and that's Pure D Bullshat.

    They track asteroids but there ain't jack they can do about them. Entropy is going to get us one way or another.
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2018
  13. tecoyah

    tecoyah Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the time frame and composition it is likely an effort would be made to divert or destroy an impending asteroid impact. The results however would be anyones guess.
     
  14. jay runner

    jay runner Well-Known Member

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    Come on now, they can't even stop Kim's nukes.
     
  15. Curious Always

    Curious Always Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    You literally just said that since you can't understand it, there's no way it can be true.
     
  16. jay runner

    jay runner Well-Known Member

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    It's just rocks. They must be hard to see.
     
  17. tecoyah

    tecoyah Well-Known Member

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    Had Lil' Kimmy ever fired a Nuke we might perhaps know if you are correct, fortunately he has not. Had we ever detected an impactor we might see if I am. Until either occurs everything is speculation.
     
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  18. WillReadmore

    WillReadmore Well-Known Member

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    Well, they are tracking 15,000 near earth objects and finding new ones at the rate of about 500 per year.

    Losing track of some for some period of time doesn't really seem that ridiculous given their number, their size and the limited attention we're willing to fund.

    And, your math is sadly lacking. Except for incredibly rare incidents, these objects aren't leaving our solar system, let alone traveling 3 light years away.
     
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  19. WillReadmore

    WillReadmore Well-Known Member

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    There are several known strategies for diverting an asteroid.

    The question is whether we detect the collision in time. We would need to determine the best solution and then design and launch a vehicle to do the work.

    That is likely to take a number of years, so the first real trick is early detection and tracking.
     
  20. cerberus

    cerberus Well-Known Member Donor

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    [​IMG] How the hell do you think that I could have calculated it; and what means do you think are available to me to track one? I averaged the rate of travel from a few legit-sounding search results. Out of curiosity, what do you believe is the speed of an asteroid? And please explain your conclusion.
     

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