Education Issues & Answers

Discussion in 'Education' started by Brock, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Brock

    Brock New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    I just recently graduated high school, in the American Public School System. Here is a list of issues I have seen, and my answers to them. My answers are not in-depth, but they're some small ways I see we could change our educational system to hopefully have higher standards for the students.

    #1: Foreign Language: In my school, we are required to have 2 credits in a foreign language. We had a choice between Spanish, and German. I chose German. I learned a lot, and I also learned this: In Europe, many many many students graduate high school multilingual, not knowing "a bit" of a language, being fluent in more then 2. They are taught from a much earlier age. I believe this should be started in the U.S. Even graduating fluent in two languages is much better then one.

    #2: Grade Standards: I remember back when a 75 was the cut-off marker. Now it is 70, at least here. What happened? I am going to look it up. Anyways, I think the goal shouldn't be to pass, but to excel. I have seen it all in my school, people allowing students to make a 70, just to survive a class. I had help myself, and I wish I had done much better. Now that I am going to college soon, I hope I can make my goal to always make a B+ or higher, never lower. I want high goals, and I think it's better for people to have high goals, not "survive".

    #3: Discipline: I want to be a teacher, but I am honestly horrified at the thought of teaching high school. A lot of the kids have dis-respect for the teacher, and all a teacher can do is send them to the principal's office, which does nothing. They usually come back within 30 minutes, and brag about how they told that principal off. I want to be able to say "If you don't want to be here, go away." If you raise cows, you cull the herd (farmer [technically rancher] reference, I have many) to get the best, well, I believe you cull the herd in education to get rid of the ones who will drag the rest down.

    #4: Classes: A major issue I see is that some classes are not worth the time. I took many classes that now that I look back, we did little to nothing. Usually because the teacher didn't care. I think this is a issue because paying someone to teach a class that is useless because the teacher doesn't care, is not worth it. Waste of money.

    I know these are rather simple ways of looking at it, but it is just what I seen when I was there. I would like your opinions on the education system in the U.S.
     
  2. perdidochas

    perdidochas Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2008
    Messages:
    27,303
    Likes Received:
    4,335
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    #1--It's based on perceived need. We don't see a need for foreign languages.

    #2--Personally, I think failure should be at 60. Less temptation for grade inflation. That said, I don't know of many middle class parents that look at Cs as truly passing.

    #3--I agree, but the problem is that most parents think that schools should have strict discipline--until their kid gets in trouble.

    #4--I agree. However, you as a student learn from the grapevine. If you can avoid certain subjects/teachers due to that.
     
  3. Clint Torres

    Clint Torres New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    0
    No worry, if your goal is to be a teacher and you become one, than your life will be like high school, short hours, no accountability, and many days off to play, and if you marry a teacher you can raise a kid who will someday be a teacher. Believe me the government cheese for teachers pays very good in the USA. If you can make it as a teacher, you will be on the gravy train. Union backed, they cant fire you. And with the DOE's own police, you can do what you want.

    Funny thing is, the same stuff you had in school was the same stuff I had over 30 years ago in high school. Not much changed, and not much will I guess. So you can expect that what you know today will be all that is needed for teaching 20 to 30 years from now.
     
  4. Brock

    Brock New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2011
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Well, I hope to be a great teacher, if I teach. I want to teach history so great, that my students will kick butt in college.
     
  5. Panzerkampfwagen

    Panzerkampfwagen New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Messages:
    11,570
    Likes Received:
    146
    Trophy Points:
    0

    It depends on what the 70, 75, etc mean. Here in Australia 50% is used as the pass mark in most educational circles. That does not mean though that Australians have to know 20% less about a topic to pass. You could make the pass 20% and it'd be equal to a 50 or a 70 or a 75 depending on how you weighted it.

    However, I have heard that many US states have lowered the grade required to pass without weighing it differently, to fudge results and make it look like they are doing a better job. That is a problem.
     
  6. Clint Torres

    Clint Torres New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    5,711
    Likes Received:
    75
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Great choice. History never changes, and you can change history if you want. History is all about memory, just remember the same thing for the rest of your life, you will never need to know anything else to be successfull as a teacher. Plus, you get to have child like hours.

    Just don't go into anything that has changes like anthropology or any cultural stuff. Why? because those classes make you do criticl thinking.

    Also, avoid private schools, as they require accountability, longer hours, more work, larger classes, and smarter students to deal with, as well as more powerful parents who may have influence over your job. Plus they don't pay as well as public school.
     

Share This Page