For U.S. Deciders, Killing People Is Like Stepping on Ants

Discussion in 'Terrorism' started by Horhey, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. Horhey

    Horhey Well-Known Member

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    Al Shifa pharmaceutical factory, Khartoum, Sudan (August 20, 1998)

    In 1998, President Clinton ordered a Tomahawk cruise missile strike that destroyed the Al-Shifa pharmaceutical plant in Sudan, while surely knowing that it would lead to the deaths of thousands of people. A crime that Noam Chomsky argues, "is even more immoral than purposeful killing, which at least recognizes the human status of the victims, not just killing ants while walking down the street, who cares?"

    A year after the attack, Jonathan Belke, in the Boston Globe, pointed out that the plant had produced "90 percent of Sudan’s major pharmaceutical products" and contended that due to its destruction "tens of thousands of people — many of them children — have suffered and died from malaria, tuberculosis, and other treatable diseases."

    It was later revealed that the administration had acted without sufficient evidence to support the claim that it was a disguised chemical weapons factory.

    Radio Television Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia (April 23, 1999)

    During the Kosovo war in 1999, NATO intentionally bombed Serbia's state broadcasting system, killing 16 employees. NATO had long argued that Serbian television was a legitimate target because it served as a propaganda weapon against the allied air campaign. U.S. envoy Richard Holbrooke described the attack as "an enormously important and, I think, positive development." Amnesty International later stated it was "a deliberate attack on a civilian object and as such constitutes a war crime."

    Much more here: A Short History of U.S. Bombing of Civilian Facilities, The Intercept, October 7 2015

    U.S. Ant Stepping in the Middle East.

    "The best of all worlds" for the U.S. in Iraq, as reported by the Times, including Thomas Friedman, who agreed with it:

    Denis Halliday and Hans von Sponeck both resigned from their posts as directors of the Oil for Food Program in Iraq because they viewed the sanctions as "genocidal ... a deliberate policy to destroy the people of Iraq." Then Secretary of State Madeline Albright told Lesley Stahl on 60 Minutes that such as price was "worth it."

    [video=youtube_share;4iFYaeoE3n4]http://youtu.be/4iFYaeoE3n4[/video]​

    According to former drone operator, Michael Haas, the mentality under the Obama administration shifted to where "a meritorious thing to do was to fire a shot, circumstances be damned":

    Moreover: "Nearly 90 Percent Of People Killed In Recent Drone Strikes Were Not The Target; U.S. drone strikes have killed scores of civilians in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia" Huffington Post, 10/15/2015

    The CIA also engages in what's called "double tap" strikes on first responders. From the report, "Living Under Drones: Death, Injury and Trauma to Civilians From US Drone Practices in Pakistan," Stanford: International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic, Stanford Law School; New York: NYU School of Law, Global Justice Clinic, 2012

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    [video=youtube_share;_olQarYwVbA]http://youtu.be/_olQarYwVbA[/video]​

    Then, of course, there's Obama's authorized murder of child for the sins of his father:

    And now we're supposed to believe the recent killing of his sister by U.S. Navy Seals was collateral damage:

    The facts on the ground:

     
  2. Horhey

    Horhey Well-Known Member

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    More cases in the Middle East:

     
  3. Horhey

    Horhey Well-Known Member

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    Bump.....
     
  4. DoctorWho

    DoctorWho Well-Known Member

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    Yes sure, load of experts contradictory to actual facts, the custom is to shield Military targets behind Civilians, trusting no action will be taken, and many Military objectives and countless Civilian lives did hang in the balance, if we did not act.. Or failed to act.

    Remember, that Pharmaceutical plant was actually actively producing Anthrax and other Weaponized agents, President Clinton ordered the elimination of that plant due to those reasons, the Civilians were killed when the Enemy combatants set off charges to destroy evidence and shot potential witnesses.
    But noooooooo, you people that were not there are going to blame the wrong people.

    Gee thanks my fellow loyal Americans !!!

    Also, the Enemy oftentimes shoots the Civilians as a means to an indictment against U.S. troops, accusing us of the same, and we have no defense against those accusations.
    But you combat experts already know this.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2017
  5. Margot2

    Margot2 Banned

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    The pharmaceutical plant in Sudan was Saudi owned and basically repackaged aspirin. Nothing to do with anthrax.. It was a screw up.

    Fortunately only one night watchman was killed.
     
  6. DoctorWho

    DoctorWho Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you know because you were boots on the ground, right ?
    Yeah.....
     
  7. Margot2

    Margot2 Banned

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    I followed the story from several perspectives including the perspective of Sudan, Saudi Arabia, the US and rather embarrassing intelligence errors.
     

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