mali is not small news

Discussion in 'Africa' started by budini, Dec 2, 2012.

  1. budini

    budini Banned

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    Talon and (deleted member) like this.
  2. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all :::::::::::::::

    here is just one example of the horrid news from mali which is actualy an explaination of all the current events news from much of the world.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    By Sudarsan Raghavan, Dec 01, 2012 02:20 AM EST

    The Washington Post BAMAKO, Mali — Khaira Arby, one of Africa’s most celebrated musicians, has performed all over the world, but there is one place she cannot visit: her native city of Timbuktu, a place steeped in history and culture but now ruled by religious extremists.

    One day, they broke into Arby’s house and destroyed her instruments. Her voice was a threat to Islam, they said, even though one of her most popular songs praised Allah.


    SOURCE: YouTube

    .“They told my neighbors that if they ever caught me, they would cut my tongue out,” said Arby, sadness etched on her broad face.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Mali’s most-respected musicians. “Now, we cannot breathe.”

    In March, amid a military coup that left the government in disarray, Tuareg rebels who once fought for Libyan autocrat Moammar Gaddafi joined forces with secessionists and Islamists linked to al-Qaeda. They swept through northern Mali, seizing major towns within weeks and effectively splitting this impoverished nation into two. Soon afterward, the Islamists and al-Qaeda militants took control.

    They have installed an ultraconservative brand of Islamic law in this moderate Muslim country, reminiscent of Afghanistan’s Taliban and Somalia’s al-Shabab movements. Now, women must wear head-to-toe garments. Smoking, alcohol, videos and any suggestions of Western culture are banned. The new decrees are enforced by public amputations, whippings and executions, prompting more than 400,000 people to flee. The extremists also destroyed tombs and other cultural treasures, saying they were against Islamic principles.

    The death of music was inevitable. It is, perhaps, Mali’s strongest link to the West. Musicians such as the late guitarist Ali Farka Toure, the Tuareg-Berber band Tinariwen and singers such as Salif Keita exported their music to the United States and Europe. They often collaborated with Western musicians.

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    ????? how did this horror start ?????

    more later ;;;

    vlad
     
  3. budini

    budini Banned

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    lets examine a few sources about muslim laws and music ;;;
    ~~~~~~~~
    Music and ArtMusic, and some other forms of art (including Tattooing),[81] under Islamic law are forbidden. Western music[82] and movies In particular, have been declared as corruptive influences by Islamic clerics. The vast majority[83] of Islamic scholars and all four schools of Islamic jurisprudence[84] are in agreement that listening to, or playing musical instruments, and singing is forbidden. They form this opinion from both the Qur'an and Hadith. The only exception to this rule which can be extracted from the hadith is the permissibility of singing acapella accompanied by a duff (a hand-held one-sided drum) on special occasions (i.e. on weddings, Eid, during jihad etc.)[85] This form of song is referred to as a Nasheed (نشيد), and the striking of the duff is permitted for women only[86] and must not be done in the presense of men.[87] There are several verses within the Qur'an which have been understood by highly respected early scholars and historians of Islam to be condemning music and singing. For example; in verse 31:6, according to the Tafseer of Ibn Kathir, "idle talks" is a reference to "singing and musical instruments."[88] While the Qur'anic verses on music and its prohibition may appear vague to non-scholars, the hadith are a lot clearer in regards to this issue. Authentic sources record Muhammad as saying "From among my followers there will be some people who will consider illegal sexual intercourse, the wearing of silk, the drinking of alcoholic drinks and the use of musical instruments, as lawful..."[89] and upon hearing music, Abu Bakr proclaimed "Musical instrument of Satan!"[84] The mere fact that Muhammad condemned music in the same breath as other non-Islamic activities, such as illegal sexual intercourse and drinking alcohol, spoke volumes and the companions (including the four Caliphs) understood.[90] As Abu Bakr rightly stated, unless performed under the various restrictions outlined in Muhammad's Sunnah, music in Islam is considered of the devil.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    After briefly explaining the evil effects of Music & dance, now time has come to give here some of the ayats of the Quran & some of the traditions of the Holy Prophet (saww) & Imams (AS) on this subject.

    Here are four Ayats of the Quran which forbid the Muslims from indulging into music.

    "So abstain from the pollution of the idols & abstain from false vain words." 22:30.

    The Arabic word "Zoor" has several meanings which include falsehood & the musical expressions. According to Imam Jaffer Sadiq (AS) "pollution of the idols" means Chess; & "Vain words" means music.
    See how 'Music' has been joined in this Ayat with the pollution of idols"; only then you can appreciate the seriousness of the sin of the Music.

    "And of the people there is he who buys a 'vain talk' so that he may lead others astray from the path of Allah without (real) knowledge & takes it (the revelation of Allah) for a mockery; for these shall be a disgracing chastisement (punishment)." 31:6.

    'Lahw' means any thing which diverts the mind from serious thinking. "Vain talk" has been interpreted by the Imam as some talk sound or thing which diverts the attention of man from the ultimate aim of his creation; in other words makes him forget Allah & His commands. For example, fictions romantic stories, & such useless talks. "It includes 'Music', intoxicants & all such diversions." (Tafseer As-Safi)

    Imam Muhammad Baquir (AS) said: Music is among the things for which Allah has promised the Fire (of Hell). Then he recited the above Ayat. (Kafi; Wasael us Shia; Tafseer As-Safi)

    "Indeed successful are the believers those who in their prayer are humble & those who keep themselves aloof from Vain (words & deeds)." (23:1-3).

    'Laghw' (Vain words & actions): The first Imam Ali (AS) said that
    "all that is void of the remembrance of Allah is 'Laghv'. According to other authentic traditions of Imams, 'Laghv' means all useless entertainment, wasteful of times among which music has been specifically mentioned. Also included in this term are vain games played just to while away the time.

    "And the servants of the Merciful Allah are those.. who bear not witness to what is false, & when they pass by what is vain they pass with dignity". (25:72).

    The words 'Zoor' & 'Laghv' have been explained earlier. According to the traditions of Imams (AS), the first part may also be translated in this way: "who do not witness what is vain"! & accordingly, it has been interpreted in the exegesis of the Quran as
    "do not listen to music."

    The following two traditions explain the second part:

    Imam Jaffer Sadiq (AS) asked some of his companions: "Where are you staying?"
    They replied: "With so & so, who has singing & dancing girls.
    Imam said: "You should have dignity."

    They thought that Imam (AS) had advised them to treat that man generously. But they were not sure; so they returned to the Imam & requested him to explain his meaning to them.

    Imam said: "have not you heard Allah saying `when they pass by what is vain they pass with dignity' ?
    Imam meant that you should not stay with a man who has singing & dancing girls.

    Second tradition: Muhammad bin Abi Ibad was known to indulge in music & liquor. He once asked Imam Ali Ar-Ridha (AS) about listening to music.

    Imam said: Some people in Hijaz have their own view about it; but that view is absolutely wrong. Have you not heard the word of Allah 'when they pass by what is vain they pass in dignity'?"
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    In Islam music is called Ghina, & in Shia sheriat is counted as one of the 'great sins'. At first, it may seem unrealistic to ban every "pleasant sound"; but there is no need to be alarmed. The Sheriat has defined 'Ghina' in a different way. In Islam, vocal music means: "Prolongation & vibration of sound with variation of the pitch to such an extent that people may say that 'he/she is singing'."

    It is evident from the above definition that the sheriat does not forbid 'pleasant sounds'; but if someone recites any thing with prolongation of sound & variation of pitch so much so that a common man thinks that he/she is singing, then & only then it will be 'Ghina' & sin.

    And it makes no difference whether the thing recited was the Quran, religious poem or love song.

    No doubt music is one of the most ancient methods of merrymaking & enjoyment, of expressing feelings & emotions. It is called 'international language', because it encompasses the whole world & does not know any geographical or political boundary.

    Let us find out what is the reason for its worldwide prevalence. We have it on the authority of Imam Jaffer Sadiq (AS) that when Hazrat Adam (AS) died, his infamous son Cain (Quabil) & Satan were very happy. Both gathered at a place & invented some musical instruments to celebrate the death of Hadhrat Adam (AS). & in the words of Imam (AS), all such musical things which people now use for merrymaking have originated from that. (Wasael-us-Shia; Babu Tahrim-e-lstimal-il-Malahi).

    So, religion & anthropology both agree that musk is a very ancient thing; & therefore, no wonder it has spread widely with the spread of the human race. But how dare a sensible 'child of Adam ' especially if he is a Muslim) "enjoy" music, which is an invention of Satan & Cain, the rebellious & disloyal son of Adam ?

    Here one may ask: But what is the harm in music ? Why it has been forbidden in Islam ?
    The answer is that music does have harmful effects on nervous system & is the cause of many ailments including ulcer, diabetes & madness. It creates imbalance in human faculties, retards spiritual development, & lowers the ethical values.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.23...2&uid=70&uid=4&uid=3739256&sid=21101510757397

    ~~~~~~~~~~~

    THERE ARE PROBABLY MORE FACTS INVOLVED WITH THIS ISSUE.
    but for this posting; it is enough.

    more later ;;;
    vlad
     
  4. budini

    budini Banned

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    lets examine a few more sources about muslim laws and music ;;;
    ~~~~~~~~
    After briefly explaining the evil effects of Music & dance, now time has come to give here some of the ayats of the Quran & some of the traditions of the Holy Prophet (saww) & Imams (AS) on this subject.

    'Lahw' means any thing which diverts the mind from serious thinking. "Vain talk" has been interpreted by the Imam as some talk sound or thing which diverts the attention of man from the ultimate aim of his creation; in other words makes him forget Allah & His commands. For example, fictions romantic stories, & such useless talks. "It includes 'Music', intoxicants & all such diversions." (Tafseer As-Safi)


    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    In Islam music is called Ghina, & in Shia sheriat is counted as one of the 'great sins'. At first, it may seem unrealistic to ban every "pleasant sound"; but there is no need to be alarmed. The Sheriat has defined 'Ghina' in a different way. In Islam, vocal music means: "Prolongation & vibration of sound with variation of the pitch to such an extent that people may say that 'he/she is singing'."

    It is evident from the above definition that the sheriat does not forbid 'pleasant sounds'; but if someone recites any thing with prolongation of sound & variation of pitch so much so that a common man thinks that he/she is singing, then & only then it will be 'Ghina' & sin.

    And it makes no difference whether the thing recited was the Quran, religious poem or love song.

    No doubt music is one of the most ancient methods of merrymaking & enjoyment, of expressing feelings & emotions. It is called 'international language', because it encompasses the whole world & does not know any geographical or political boundary.

    Let us find out what is the reason for its worldwide prevalence. We have it on the authority of Imam Jaffer Sadiq (AS) that when Hazrat Adam (AS) died, his infamous son Cain (Quabil) & Satan were very happy. Both gathered at a place & invented some musical instruments to celebrate the death of Hadhrat Adam (AS). & in the words of Imam (AS), all such musical things which people now use for merrymaking have originated from that. (Wasael-us-Shia; Babu Tahrim-e-lstimal-il-Malahi).

    So, religion & anthropology both agree that musk is a very ancient thing; & therefore, no wonder it has spread widely with the spread of the human race. But how dare a sensible 'child of Adam ' especially if he is a Muslim) "enjoy" music, which is an invention of Satan & Cain, the rebellious & disloyal son of Adam ?

    Here one may ask: But what is the harm in music ? Why it has been forbidden in Islam ?
    The answer is that music does have harmful effects on nervous system & is the cause of many ailments including ulcer, diabetes & madness. It creates imbalance in human faculties, retards spiritual development, & lowers the ethical values.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Music and Islam: A Deeper Look

    By Hussein Rashid, Hofstra University

    The religious arts of the Muslim world manifest particular cultural characteristics and a sense of unity across cultures. The devotional music of Nigeria and Pakistan, for example, have a recognizable relationship, but are also uniquely Nigerian and Pakistani. Jacques Jomier attributes this phenomenon to the way Islam moves through the world:

    Islam is like a clear stream, with well defined characteristic, which is the same everywhere. But the soil over which the stream flows can be very varied. Moreover, in each case, the water will take on the color of the shores, the sand or the earth which forms its bed.

    The cultural specificity that emerges is in conversation with the idea of what a “true” or “pure” Islam is. This discussion is present through nearly all art forms, literature, painting, architecture, and music, drawing out the question of when art ceases to be “Islamic,” or religiously permissible.

    There is a popular perception that music is generally forbidden in Islam. However, such a prescriptive statement elevates the issue to one of faith. The answer to the question is open to interpretation. The first consistent scholarly attack on music dates to the mid-10th century, and seems to be in response to illicit behavior tied to music, rather than to the music itself. No Islamic scholar would argue that Qur’anic recitation (qira’at) is forbidden, and many would argue that the Qur’an should be recited as beautifully as possible. To a person unfamiliar with qira’at, the sound would resemble music. However, in an Islamic legal framework the recitation is not music, and to call it so is insulting. The problem is that the term “music,” representing some combination of instruments and voice, does not map well onto the Arabic term musiqa; musiqa is one kind of audio art in the Islamic legal tradition; qira’at is another.

    The debate among Muslims is not about the permissibility of audio art, but about what kind of audio arts are permissible. The Qur’an, the first source of legal authority for Muslims, contains no direct references to music. Legal scholars use the hadith (saying and actions of Prophet Muhammad) as another source of authority, and have found conflicting evidence in it. The consensus that has emerged is that the audio arts fall into three broad categories: legitimate, controversial, and illegitimate. Qira’at, the call to prayer, religious chants and the like are all considered legitimate. Controversial audio arts include almost all other types of music. Illegitimate audio arts are considered to be those that take people away from the commandments of the faith. Music that leads to drinking or licentious behavior is considered illegitimate. Depending on the community of interpretation, one can find devotional music legitimate, controversial, or illegitimate.

    Sufis, a broad category for a group of Muslims who generally take on a more personal and esoteric approach to the faith, argue that devotional audio arts must be bound by three things to be considered legitimate: time, place, and companions. Al-Ghazali, the famed 11th/12th century Sunni Muslim, argues that a good time is one that allows you to complete religious and societal obligations and no diversion should take time away from performing obligations. The place for the performance of audio art should be an appropriate setting-- no concerts in masjids, and no performances in bars. Finally, the companions, the people surrounding the listener, should encourage the best in the listener.

    The 10th century philosophical group, the Ikhwan as-Safa, argue that the truest audio art is the Voice of God, which the Prophet Moses heard at Sinai. When Moses heard the Voice, he moved beyond the need for earthly music. Based on this moment, the Ikhwan as-Safa believe that human audio arts are necessary echoes to remind us of the true music. The 15th century Persian mystical poet Jami says that in the Qur’an, when God says He is blowing life into the form of man (38:72) it should be understood that human beings are the first musical instrument. The famous Sufi poet Rumi (13th century) also plays with the idea of human beings as musical instruments. He opens his work the Mathnawi, perhaps one of his most famous poems, with the lines, “Listen to the reed as it tells a tale/ a tale of separation,” a statement on the human condition of removal from the Divine. It is also argued that the Prophet David (who authored the Psalms according to Muslims) and the Prophet Solomon both had beautiful voices and sang freely.

    Drawing from these traditions, Muslims have an understanding of the permissible audio arts. For the legally minded, the traditional consensus is that nothing can be forbidden that is not explicitly forbidden by the Qur’an or the Prophet. As a result, contemporary scholars including Shaykh al-Azhar Mahmud Shaltut, Shaykh Yusuf Qaradawi, and Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini have all issued legal rulings that audio arts that do not encourage people to go against the faith are permitted.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    THERE ARE PROBABLY MORE FACTS INVOLVED WITH THIS ISSUE.

    ~~~~~~~

    but it is very possible to post a summary understanding; from my own personal point of view.

    almost all religious muslims ( except for a few suffi sects ) are very puritanical about music. yes puritanical; similar to the old pilgrims in boston and plymuth.

    more later ;;;
    vlad
     
  5. budini

    budini Banned

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    here is someone from the internet; a singer, who calls himself "mali music" ----
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNylksZ-suc
    ~~~~~~~~~~

    here is an article from google ;;
    Music of Mali
    The Music of Mali is dominated by forms derived from the ancient Mande Empire. The Mande people make up most of the country's population, and their musicians, professional performers called jeliw (sing. jeli, French griot), have produced a vibrant popular music scene alongside traditional folk music. Influences also come from the hundreds of ethnic groups surrounding Mali, as well as Moorish and European musical forms.

    Mande musicStyles: donkilo - jaliya - kumbengo - praise singing - sataro - Wassoulou hunters' song. Instruments: balo - balafon - bolon - djembe - doundoun - fle - kamalengoni - karinyan - kontingo - kora - ngoni - soku - tama - tamani. Other:jali. Mande include the Mandinka, Maninka and Bamana.[1]

    The Mande people are divided into various groups based on language. They all claim descent from the legendary warrior Sunjata Keita, who founded the Mande Empire. The Mandeka kan, language of the people of Mande is spoken with different dialects in Mali and in parts of surrounding Burkina Faso, Ivory Coast, Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, Senegal and The Gambia. The most common dialects of Mandeka kan are Bamanan kan and Djoula kan. Djoula kan, a sub-dialect of Bamanan kan, is spoken by descendants of Bamanan people who settled mainly in Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso through trade or the expansion of the Mande Empire and the Bamanan and Kenedougou kingdoms. Djoula which means trader in Bamanan, and kan means language. The Djoula kan dialect was born from the influence of local languages on Bamanankan, which is itself a Mandekan dialect. As local people in Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso called the travelling traders by their trade name (Djoula), they also used the same name to identify the language they spoke (Djoula kan). Mande music remains a very important aspect of Malian culture. One confusing aspect of the Mande groups is the integration of Fula people (French: Peuls; Fula: Fulɓe; Bambara: Fulaw) into Mande culture. The Mansa Sunjata forced some of these pastoral herders to settle in various regions where the dominant ethnic groups were Maninka or Bamana. Thus, today, we see a number of people with Fula names (Diallo, Diakite, Sangare, Sidibe) who display Fula cultural characteristics, but only speak the language of the Maninka or Bamana.[

    ManinkaManinka music traces its roots back more than eight centuries to a folkloric epoch at the time of the great Mansa Sunjata during the great Mande-centered Mali Empire, and his semi-mythic rivallry with ruler Soumaoro Kante. Mansa Sunjata sent his jeli (modern day historian/musician/orator), or advisor, Diakouma Doua, to learn the secrets of his rival Soumaoro of the Susu people. During this encounter he finds an instrument now known as the "Soso Bala" (believed to be the semi-magical first Balafon). In jeli folklore this instrument is said to have been the source of the great sorcerer Soumaoro's power. When Soumaoro heard the beautiful music that Diakouma played on the bala (currently referred to as a balafon, fon was added by Occidentals) Soumaoro named him Bala Fasseke Kwate (Master of the bala). The Soso Bala still rests with the descendents of the Kouyate lineage in Niaggasola, Guinea, just across the modern border from Mali.

    Maninka music is often mistakenly labeled diatonic. Actually, Maninka uses multiple tunings, both major and minor, as well as some "semi-tone" scales. Adherence to note relationships (not writing), decades of ear training and transpositions, that enables the Maninka musician to easily adjust to other styles, tunings, and repertoires of music. Maninka music is a major part of the African roots of American blues music.

    InstrumentsThe common instruments of the Maninka jeli ensemble are the kora (21-24 string lute-harp, classified by the manner of playing as well as the bridge structure), the bala (a slat idiophone constructed of wood with small gourd resonators, similar to a xylophone), the n'goni (a 4-7 string lute), the jeli dununba (a large mallet drum hung from one shoulder and played with a curved stick, accompanied by a bell played with the opposite hand), the n'taman (an hourglass shaped tension drum, both large and small variations, often called the talking drum), and the tabale (a tall conga-shaped drum played with long, thin flexible sticks). Since the 1950s the jeli have also added the guitar to their repertoire which now plays a significant role in much of jeli music. Most modern touring musicians mix traditional instruments with guitar, electric bass, keyboards, and drum set. As Jeli Lamine Soumano states: "If you want to learn the bala go to Guinea or Mali. If you want to learn the kora go to Gambia or Mali. If you want to learn the n'goni you have only to go to Mali." Each area has developed a specialty instrument, while still recognizing that the roots of the related forms come from Mali.

    Most vocalists are female in everyday Mande culture, partially due to the fact that many traditional celebrations revolve around weddings and baptisms, mostly attended by women. Several male and female singers are world renowned. Although it once was rare for women to play certain instruments, in the 21st century women have broadened their range.

    [edit] PlayersThe traditional form of the jenbe ensemble is most commonly attributed to the Maninka and Maraka ethnic groups. In its most basic arrangement there is one small dunun (konkoni) and one jenbe soloist. A jenbe accompanist who carries a steady pattern throughout the piece has since been added, as well as the addition of the jeli dununba (also referred to as the Kassonke dunun, names derived from the style of playing and not distinctions of the physical instruments), and the n'tamani (small taliking drum). Many ethnic groups, including the Kassonke, the Djokarame, the Kakalo, the Bobo, the Djoula, the Susu, and others, have historical connections to the jenbe as well.

    Maninka music is the most complex of the three Mande cultures. It is highly ornamented and heptatonic, dominated by female vocalists and dance-oriented rhythms. The ngoni lute is the most popular traditional instrument. Most of the best-known Maninka musicians are from eastern Guinea and play a type of guitar music that adapts balafon-playing (traditional xylophone) to the imported instrument.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    here is a musician from mali ----
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PKdK_68r0A&feature=player_embedded#!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0KWOEexo2xk
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WXjTDZEXzA
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    listen to the string instrument in this video; this is borbidden by the koran and is one of the instruments which the terrorists have taken from musicians in mali.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTEEdkRHNYU
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TiZ0WvIc1QY

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    i shall post more information about this later;
    vlad
     
  6. budini

    budini Banned

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    at this point we have established that there is a nation in north africa called "MALI" and this nation has a tradition of music. also this nation has new terrorist muslims who are against a part of the traditions of MALI. these terrorists are against music. here are some more articles about it.

    ~~~~~~~

    Mali: no rhythm or reason as militants declare war on music

    Islamist militants are banning music in northern Mali, a chilling proposition for a country where music is akin to mineral wealth


    The pickup halted in Kidal, the far-flung Malian desert town that is home to members of the Grammy award-winning band Tinariwen. Seven AK47-toting militiamen got out and marched to the family home of a local musician. He wasn't home, but the message delivered to his sister was chilling: "If you speak to him, tell him that if he ever shows his face in this town again, we'll cut off all the fingers he uses to play his guitar with."

    The gang then removed guitars, amplifiers, speakers, microphones and a drum kit from the house, doused them with petrol, and set them ablaze. In northern Mali, religious war has been declared on music.

    When a rabble of different Islamist groups took control of the region in April there were fears that its rich culture would suffer. But no one imagined that music would almost cease to exist – not in Mali, a country that has become internationally renowned for its sound.

    Toumani Diabaté, Malian kora player, in Bamako. Photograph: Karen Robinson/ Karen Robinson "Culture is our petrol," says Toumani Diabaté, the Malian kora player who has collaborated with Damon Albarn and Björk, to name but a few. "Music is our mineral wealth. There isn't a single major music prize in the world today that hasn't been won by a Malian artist."

    "Music regulates the life of every Malian," adds Cheich Tidiane Seck, a prolific Malian musician and producer. "From the cradle to the grave. From ancient times right up to today. A Mali without music? No … I mean … give me another one!"

    And yet that is the bland reality dawning on this once joy-filled land. International observers claim the leaders of the three armed Islamic groups who now control the northern Malian cities of Timbuktu, Kidal and Gao are motivated by money and power rather the dream of a caliphate in the Sahel. There are strong ties between these groups and the less than holy interests of major drug-traffickers and arms smugglers.

    But many of the mujahideen who have zoned in on the conflict from all over the Muslim world are fired by an unquestionable religious zeal. The same goes for Iyad Ag Ghaly, a Touareg strongman and born-again Salafist, who founded the Ansar-ud-Deen movement at the end of last year.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~

    France to send drones to Mali in fight against al-Qaida-backed insurgents

    Move is reportedly part of 'unprecedented' intervention with US and EU states to tackle threat following coup in March

    ~~~~~~~~~~~

    more later;
    vlad
     
  7. budini

    budini Banned

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    it has come to the time when we must examine political relations between russia and mali.

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    [ this is from google ]

    Soviet-era relationsThe Soviet Union recognised the independence of Mali on 7 July 1960, and diplomatic relations between the two states were established on 14 October 1960. Following the collapse of the Mali Federation, and due to French support for Senegal, Modibo Keïta, the first President of Mali, sought closer ties with the Soviet Union. In 1961 the two countries signed trade and cultural pacts, and the Soviet Union granted Mali loans and other aid, which included the acquisition of two Ilyushin Il-18 passenger aircraft for Air Mali. Under the cultural agreement Russia sent circus performers, sports coaches and a soccer team to Mali.

    When Keïta was overthrown by Moussa Traoré by a coup d'état in 1968, Traoré improved relations with France and other Western countries, but Mali remained dependent on the Soviet Union for the arming and training of its military. Approximately 50 Soviet military advisers provided armour, artillery and parachute training to Mali's military, and trained all of Mali's pilots. The Soviets also improved the Malian Air Force base in Mopti, and occasionally used Malian airfields to stage supply flights for groups it supported in Angola.

    Russian Federation relations Diplomatic ties
    Dmitry Medvedev with Bréhima CoulibalyOn 16 January 1992, Mali recognised the Russian Federation as the successor state of the Soviet Union, after the latter's dissolution. Russia has an embassy in Bamako, and Mali has an embassy in Moscow. The current Ambassador of Russia to Mali is Anatoly Pavlovich Smirnov, who presented his Letters of Credence to President of Mali Amadou Toumani Touré on 4 November 2005. The current Ambassador of Mali to Russia is Bréhima Coulibaly, who presented his Letters of Credence to Russian President Dmitry Medvedev on 16 January 2009.

    Political tiesIn 2003 in Bamako from April 30, 2003 to May 1, 2003 meetings were held by Alexander Makarenko, Director of the Africa Department of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, with N. L. Traore, Secretary General of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of Mali.
    In 2005 Anatoly Safonov, the Special Presidential Representative for International Cooperation in the Fight Against Terrorism and Cross-Border Organized Crime, met from January 25, 2005 through January 28, 2005 in Bamako with his Mali counterpart.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~
    more later;
    vlad
     
  8. Talon

    Talon Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    This horror started with the Tuaregs and their ill-conceived alliance with Ansar Dine, the Movement for Unity and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO) and Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.

    As we discussed earlier this year, music hasn't been the only thing that the jihadists in Mali have targeted:

    [video=youtube;rhaR3M09Yes]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rhaR3M09Yes[/video]
     
  9. budini

    budini Banned

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    to talon :::::::::::::::

    i most certainl thank you for your comment.

    i was surprised to find that tuaregs are with alqueda because i know that they were once very loyal to ghaddafi.

    however, i found another video of great importance in this issue of islamist terrorists in mali. here it is ---
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OuKzFDDI5Q4
    ~~~~~~~~~~
    also we have this video about shrines in mali. it seems they are the graves of some old sufic sect leaders.
    all of the strict islamists are against the sufic sects, and claim that they are against the belief that mohammad the prophet of allah as being the last prophet. here is the video i found --- http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=fvwp&v=C4jfyYnTvNc&NR=1 ------
    ~~~~~~~~~~~
    more later;
    vlad
     
  10. Oh Yeah

    Oh Yeah Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    What a sad religion it must be. Guess they don't believe in the angels singing. It must be a very insecure religion to try and destroy all things history not associated with their believes. A true religion would not be afraid to defend itself on it's merits and not be afraid of open dialog.
     
  11. budini

    budini Banned

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    to oh yeah ::::::::::::

    thank you for your comment.

    if we research in history, we would find many such groups as alqueda with the same puritan values and the same horrid actions. please write again.

    vlad
     
  12. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all ::::::::::::

    this thread does need more comments.

    here is some paint job from google.


    Hillary Clinton in Algeria to press for Mali military action
    US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was in Algeria Monday to press for possible military intervention in neighbouring Mali, where Islamic extremists have taken over large parts of the country.

    Algeria, with its powerful army, was at first opposed to any military intervention in Mali Photo: Louafi Larbi/REUTERS3:40PM GMT 29 Oct 2012
    Mrs Clinton held talks with President Abdelaziz Bouteflika and other ministers as part of a bid by the US and France to secure Algeria's vital backing for any use of force against militants in Mali.

    The UN Security Council has called on West African nations to ready a military force against al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM), which is tightening its grip on the north of Mali. Rebels and extremists essentially partitioned the country after a coup in March.

    Algeria, which shares a long border with Mali, had initially ruled out sending in troops.

    A US State Department official travelling with Mrs Clinton said Algeria's role in a resolution to the crisis would be a "central focus".

    "In the context of what happened in North Mali when the government forces up there collapsed and the coup happened, Algeria's importance has become ever more important and it will really be a central focus in the talks between the secretary and president," said the official.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    it looks as if the US is sending allies to mali to stop the terrorists.


    more later;
    vlad
     
  13. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all :::::::::::::

    here is a very interesting article from the internet.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Mali's whisky-drinking rebel turned Islamist chief
    In the course of an eventful life, Iyad Ag Ghali, head of the al Qaeda-linked Ansar Dine, has been a rebel, diplomat, negotiator and Islamist militant. In his latest avatar, he could also now determine the future of northern Mali. By Leela JACINTO (text) On May 30, 2007, Iyad Ag Ghali, the current luxuriantly-bearded head of Ansar Dine, an al Qaeda-linked militant group, walked into the US embassy in the Malian capital of Bamako for a friendly chat with the ambassador.

    US diplomats at the meeting were clearly sympathetic to the man who would go on to turn into the scourge of the breakaway region of northern Mali.

    “Soft-spoken and reserved, ag Ghali [sic] showed nothing of the cold-blooded warrior persona created by the Malian press,” noted a leaked US Embassy cable.

    A fearsome Tuareg fighting man who, like many of his brothers-in-arms, had fought for a motley mix of bosses and rebel groups, Ag Ghali was attempting to negotiate yet another shotgun ceasefire in the long history of conflict between the Malian government and Tuareg rebels of various stripes and allegiances.

    The cable noted that a “seemingly tired” Ag Ghali told the US ambassador that then-Malian President Amadou Toumani Toure had accepted Ag Ghali’s request for a diplomatic posting in Saudi Arabia. During his “wide-ranging meeting”, Ag Ghali repeatedly requested US assistance for “targeted special operations” against al Qaeda’s North African branch, AQIM (Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb).

    In this stretch of the Sahel - the remote region bridging the Sahara and the African savannah where the borders of Mali, Algeria, Niger and Mauritania meet - the fortunes of men seem to change with the shifting sands.

    Former, democratically-elected Malian President Toure - or ATT, as he’s known - was ousted in a March 22 military coup and is currently in exile in Senegal.




    MALI
    Mali's perfect storm of woes creates a perfect militant breeding zone



    Ag Ghali, the man he once chose to diplomatically represent the country, is now back home in northern Mali, a rebel commander who has undiplomatically turned against the Malian state and seeking to implement whatever is his vision of an Islamic emirate in a breakaway region the size of France.

    Five years after he pressed the US for targeted operations against AQIM, Ag Ghali is currently linked with al Qaeda’s North African branch, with regional and Western intelligence citing credible reports that AQIM is currently fighting alongside Ansar Dine in northern Mali.

    Along with a motley mix of rebel groups, Ag Ghali’s Islamist Ansar Dine seized control of northern Mali in the chaos following ATT’s ouster, sparking a perfect storm of crises in the region.

    From war-maker to peace-dealer, from national representative to rebel, from whisky-drinking Tuareg fighter to teetotaling jihadist, Ag Ghali has had an eventful, contradictory life. At each step, and with every twist and turn of his allegiances, he has succeeded in dragging along the fortunes of his unfortunate people - whether they like it or not.

    The man in the middle

    As the international community scrambles to respond to the current Malian situation, Ag Ghali is once again poised to position himself as a key player in whatever the outcome of the latest crisis brings.

    FRANCE 24's FOCUS ON MALI-NIGER



    “He put himself at the center of this rebellion, which is exactly what he wanted,” says Andrew McGregor, senior editor of the Global Terrorism Program at the US-based Jamestown Foundation. “He has become the important figure in northern Mali at the moment in determining its political future.”

    From a fairly nondescript boyhood as the son of nomad cattle herders to a regional kingpin - sometimes called "the lion of the desert - Ag Ghali is a self-made man who has insolently tied his destiny with history.

    “Iyad is a very complex character,” says Jeremy Keenan, a professorial research associate at the London-based School of Oriental and African Studies. “He’s clever, a brilliant negotiator, he likes being the boss and he’s a person who can never be trusted to keep his word.”

    A little over a year after Ag Ghali so impressed US diplomats, the US Embassy in Bamako appeared to have learned that lesson.

    An October 2008 leaked US cable questions whether Ag Ghali “is playing both sides”, and describes a man far away from home, in the Malian consulate in Jeddah, constantly on the phone, controlling the shots in the northern Mali.

    “Ag Ghali continues to cast a shadow over northern Mali,” the cable notes before adding, “Like the proverbial bad penny, ag Ghali [sic] turns up whenever a cash transaction between a foreign government and Kidal Tuaregs appears forthcoming.”

    All in the family: abducting and releasing hostages

    The cash transactions in question are ransom payments doled out by mostly European governments for the release of their citizens captured in the Sahel, an unpoliceable zone where smuggling and kidnappings are common income sources - and very profitable ones for Ag Ghali and his AQIM friends.



    TERRORISM
    Key figures in al Qaeda's North African branch


    Most experts agree that Ag Ghali’s ties to AQIM have been intricately linked to the hostage business.

    According to Keenan, Ag Ghali’s cousin, Abdel Krim operates under senior AQIM leader, Abdelhamid Abou Zeid, who heads one of the most violent AQIM katibas (or brigades) responsible for a spate of kidnappings over the past few years, including those of Frenchman Pierre Camatte and British tourist Edwin Dyer.

    While his cousin has been part of AQIM’s kidnapping operations, Ag Ghali for a while positioned himself as the hostage negotiator, a task he fulfilled admirably. “He’s understood to make a lot of money for this; he doesn’t do it for free,” notes McGregor.

    Giving peace – and Islam – a chance

    Born in the northern Malian town of Kidal into the elite, noble Iforas clan that claims sharif status - or ancestral links to the Prophet Muhammed - Ag Ghali’s exact age is not known. Experts believe he was born in the 1950s.

    As a young man, Ag Ghali, like many Tuareg men his age, left northern Mali to serve as a mercenary for Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi.

    FRANCE 24 EXCLUSIVE

    MALI
    Mali's coup leader Amadou Sanogo speaks to FRANCE 24.


    ~~~~~

    vlad
     
  14. budini

    budini Banned

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    this is part two ::::::::


    FRANCE 24 EXCLUSIVE

    MALI
    Mali's coup leader Amadou Sanogo speaks to FRANCE 24.


    Like many militant leaders, Ag Ghali has created his own fighting narrative, much of which is likely to be true. “During the 1980s in Gaddafi’s legions, he was dispatched to fight in Chad and he now claims to have fought the Israelis in southern Lebanon,” says Keenan.

    In the early 1990s, he returned to Mali to take part in a Tuareg rebellion as a rebel senior commander before he abandoned the fight to help negotiate a peace deal with the government.

    It was around this time that he encountered a handful of preachers from Tablighi Jamaat, a controversial Pakistan-based spiritual reformation movement, attempting to proselytize in the Sahel.

    The fundamentalist preachers were having little success in a region with a strong Sufi tradition and little patience for hardline Islam when they landed in Kidal and encountered Ag Ghali.

    His subsequent religious conversion is a matter of much debate within his community, with some Tuaregs insisting it was an expedient move for an ambitious Iforas leader to boost his religious credentials. Others, however, say it could well have been a genuine religious awakening.

    It was during his stint as consul general in the Saudi city of Jeddah that Ag Ghali made the transition from pacifist fundamentalist to hardline Islamist, a move that alarmed his hosts and resulted in his expulsion from Saudi Arabia.

    Two rejections and another rebellion

    Back home in northern Mali, Ag Ghali helped negotiate an end to the 2007-2008 rebellion, which did not win him many friends among his Tuareg rebel colleagues, who accused him of abandoning his men by taking off for Saudi Arabia, then compromising their cause with the August 2008 Algerian-negotiated peace deal.

    His poor standing was evident when he lost his leadership bid for the amenokal - or traditional chief - of his Kel Iforas clan last year.



    MALI
    Strange bedfellows: The MNLA’s on-again, off-again marriage with Ansar Dine


    Ag Ghali suffered a second rejection after the 2011 Libyan uprising, when Tuareg mercenaries returning home with arsenal looted from Gaddafi’s barracks prepared to launch the latest uprising led by the secessionist MNLA.

    “The MNLA was not interested in having him as their leader because he had close ties with the Malian government and is basically viewed as a collaborator,” says McGregor.

    Undaunted by his failed MNLA leasdership bid, Ag Ghali formed his own militant group, the Islamist Ansar Dine. “He was able to establish Ansar Dine in a pretty short amount of time, which speaks for his organizational skills and probably his charisma,” says McGergor.

    According to McGregor, Ag Ghali’s reputation as a collaborator could possibly explain the ruthlessness displayed by Ansar Dine fighters in the current rebellion, which has been recorded in reports by groups such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International.

    Over the past few weeks, a tenuous alliance between Ansar Dine and the secular Tuareg MNLA appears to be unraveling as clashes between the two broke out last week in Ag Ghali’s hometown of Kidal.

    Cultivating an aura of mystique

    Since northern Mali fell from government control following the March 22 coup, Ag Ghali appears to have maintained a low public profile.



    Islamist rebels of Ansar Dine pictured on April 24, 2012, near Timbuktu, in rebel-held northern Mali, during the release of a Swiss hostage. (AFP PHOTO / ROMARIC OLLO HIEN)


    There have been a few sightings of him in some northern Malian cities such as Timbuktu, where he gave a speech to reassure anxious residents shortly after the city fell, according to witnesses.

    But in sharp contrast to the MNLA’s well-oiled publicity machine, Ag Ghali has been noticeable by his absence on the regional and international airwaves.

    “I’ve been monitoring the jihadist sites and what struck me was the complete absence of communiqués from his movement or even messages of supports by the jihadist community,” said McGregor. “It seems that even the jihadist community seems unsure of him – it speaks for his mercurial nature.”

    According to Keenan, Ag Ghali’s recent reclusiveness only adds to his mystery.

    “Unlike the MNLA, which has launched a propaganda war with spokesmen – many of them based in Paris – putting out statements, Iyad doesn’t have that facility,” says Keenan. “In many ways, it’s part of his strategy not to play the media game. It’s an effective one because it adds to an almost mystical air about him.”

    But mystique alone does not make for military or political success. “To be successful in northern Mali requires large-scale support,” says McGregor. It’s not clear if Ag Ghali has that, but if his track record is anything to go by, he will certainly try for that.

    “Whatever he decides,” notes McGregor, “it will probably be the most important determining factor in northern Mali.”
     
  15. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all :::::::::::

    yes, we all know, the last two postings were really one article. that is not the important point.

    the important point is that it tells all about one of the terrorist leaders. a amn who just goes from one military group to another and knows nothing about global warming.

    hey everyone tell us all what you think about this "islamist fighter".

    vlad
     
  16. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all :::::

    here is another very telling article

    In Africa: Conflict in Mali meets a worsening food crisis

    April 2, 2012
    By Bob Kitchen

    The International Rescue Committee is launching an emergency response in Mali, where the drought spreading across the Sahel region has been compounded by political instability.

    Although Mali’s “lean season” does not normally begin until April, the country's food supplies began running low last November. More than 3 million people in Mali — 20 percent of the country’s population — don’t have access to the food they need.

    In Mali, a decades-long Tuareg rebellion has flared in the north, while an army-led coup has overthrown the central government.

    Fighting between government forces and a Tuareg rebel group — the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) — broke out in January 2012. The MNLA seeks to establish an independent state in their home region of northern Mali, a region rich in uranium and oil.

    The collapse of the Libyan government this past summer has added fighters and arms to the rebellion. Many of the nomadic Tuaregs who were fighting for Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi have now returned to Mali — bringing with them a wave of heavy weapons from Gaddafi’s former arsenal.

    Two weeks ago, junior officers from the Malian army staged a coup, citing their discontent with the government’s unsuccessful attempts to quell the Tuareg rebellion.

    Today marked the end of a 72-hour grace period the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) had given the coup leaders to return Mali to civilian rule. Effective immediately, ECOWAS has closed the borders between Mali and its neighbors. The move follows other tough economic and diplomatic sanctions imposed by ECOWAS to try to force the military junta from power.

    In the meantime, the Tuareg rebels have solidified their hold on the north. After capturing three northern towns over the weekend the MNLA claims that they have now achieved their avowed aim of an independent state

    Since January, the fighting has displaced some 95,000 people within Mali and has forced more than 100,000 to flee to neighboring Niger, Mauritania, and Burkina Faso.

    My team is deploying to eastern Mali this week to assess humanitarian needs and begin to provide lifesaving health care and clean water to people who have been uprooted by the ongoing conflict.

    Urgent: Crisis in Mali
    Donate Now: Your donation will support the lifesaving work of the IRC’s Emergency Team, who are preparing to set up health, nutrition, water and sanitation programs to help families in need.
    Posted in Emergency Response, Sahel Crisis, Africa, Mali | Tags: refugees, conflict, natural disaster, humanitarian aid, Mali, Sahel

    more later;
    vlad
     
  17. budini

    budini Banned

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    to all :::::

    here is another very telling article

    In Africa: Conflict in Mali meets a worsening food crisis

    April 2, 2012
    By Bob Kitchen

    The International Rescue Committee is launching an emergency response in Mali, where the drought spreading across the Sahel region has been compounded by political instability.

    Although Mali’s “lean season” does not normally begin until April, the country's food supplies began running low last November. More than 3 million people in Mali — 20 percent of the country’s population — don’t have access to the food they need.

    In Mali, a decades-long Tuareg rebellion has flared in the north, while an army-led coup has overthrown the central government.

    Fighting between government forces and a Tuareg rebel group — the National Movement for the Liberation of Azawad (MNLA) — broke out in January 2012. The MNLA seeks to establish an independent state in their home region of northern Mali, a region rich in uranium and oil.

    The collapse of the Libyan government this past summer has added fighters and arms to the rebellion. Many of the nomadic Tuaregs who were fighting for Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi have now returned to Mali — bringing with them a wave of heavy weapons from Gaddafi’s former arsenal.

    Two weeks ago, junior officers from the Malian army staged a coup, citing their discontent with the government’s unsuccessful attempts to quell the Tuareg rebellion.

    Today marked the end of a 72-hour grace period the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) had given the coup leaders to return Mali to civilian rule. Effective immediately, ECOWAS has closed the borders between Mali and its neighbors. The move follows other tough economic and diplomatic sanctions imposed by ECOWAS to try to force the military junta from power.

    In the meantime, the Tuareg rebels have solidified their hold on the north. After capturing three northern towns over the weekend the MNLA claims that they have now achieved their avowed aim of an independent state

    Since January, the fighting has displaced some 95,000 people within Mali and has forced more than 100,000 to flee to neighboring Niger, Mauritania, and Burkina Faso.

    My team is deploying to eastern Mali this week to assess humanitarian needs and begin to provide lifesaving health care and clean water to people who have been uprooted by the ongoing conflict.

    Urgent: Crisis in Mali
    Donate Now: Your donation will support the lifesaving work of the IRC’s Emergency Team, who are preparing to set up health, nutrition, water and sanitation programs to help families in need.
    Posted in Emergency Response, Sahel Crisis, Africa, Mali | Tags: refugees, conflict, natural disaster, humanitarian aid, Mali, Sahel

    more later;
    vlad
     
  18. skeptic-f

    skeptic-f New Member

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    I would point out to the forum Islamophobes that the armed Muslims in Timbuktu are Islamo-fascist Al-Qaeda types and a fair number aren't even from Mali. They even destroyed a few Muslim mausoleums on the grounds they weren't properly Muslim. These extremist jerks should hardly be seen as representative of the local Muslim population or of the religion of Islam as a whole.
     
  19. budini

    budini Banned

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    to skeptic :::::::::::

    i agree.

    thanks for your input.

    vlad
     
  20. Mr. Swedish Guy

    Mr. Swedish Guy New Member

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    Indeed. Mali has been muslim for what, round 800 years now? and the local muslims didn't destroy anything. A contrairo, I don't actually think there were much to destroy before it became muslim in the first place. I have an undescribably deep hatred for people destroying heritage sites and historical things. I LOATHE THEM. I just realised that I don't like irreplaceable things gone, hence why I'm an environmentalist, a conservative, and a ethnic conservative.
     
  21. budini

    budini Banned

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    to mr. swedish :::::

    i thank you, also, for your input.

    please tell us all what you do know about the heritage of the republik of mali.

    vlad
     
  22. Mr. Swedish Guy

    Mr. Swedish Guy New Member

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    Most I know of mali comes from civilization IV and V... I know they were pagan until sometime during the 1200-1400, that they got really rich by trade and gold mines, that one of their kings mansa musa was famously rich and made a pilgrimage to mecca, and that before the rise of the mali the was a songhai empire there, one of it's rulers names ashka or something.
     
  23. budini

    budini Banned

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    to mr. swedish ::::::::

    ??? can you post any links ???

    ? do you know anything about the architecture of this cuture ?

    vlad
     
  24. Mr. Swedish Guy

    Mr. Swedish Guy New Member

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    No, not really but I guess it will be on wikipedia. and in civ4 if you care to install it for this reason. I know how the sankore mosque looks like and it is sort of famous.
     
  25. budini

    budini Banned

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    to swedish guy ::::::::::

    i have not been able to reply as i would like to; please excuse me. i have so little time to do all that i want to do.

    the local culture, the native people, of mali do have a certain architectural greatness. they have a system of ventilation which has no moving mechanical parts. i am not at all certain as to how it is done, and whenever i have mentioned it among those of the arab muslim culture who seem to have some knowledge of architecture and engineering; i have negative and even hostile results. the native architectual system of ventilation is somehow based on narrow tunnels which are built into the four foot thick walls of the buildings. these tunnels are made with increasing and decreasing internal width and openings which are on the top or the bottom of the walls;; and on the inside or the outside of the walls. the increasing and decreasing of internal width has something to do with the expansion and contraction of air at different temperatures. but as to exactly how this is all done i do not know. the only result which my personal research has given me is the understanding that most educated arab-muslims are not interested in the ability of their own cultures, but are only interested in learning the polution technology of the western industrial system.

    ??? do you understand what i mean mr. swedish guy ????

    vlad
     

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