Stolen valor

Discussion in 'Veterans' started by Troianii, Jan 20, 2014.

  1. Troianii

    Troianii Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I disagreed with someone earlier today but the disagreement didn't last long because it was essentially a difference of feeling, and neither of us knew the official policy. Now most of us have heard of stolen valor, when someone impersonates an officer/soldier etc. My question is, if you're not actually pretending to be such an individual, but use a uniform or uniform piece at a costume party, is that stolen valor?
     
  2. Soupnazi

    Soupnazi Well-Known Member

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    Stolen Valor is actually the title of an outstanding book by B.G. Burkett. look it up on Amazon.

    It is in fact about real veterans and fake veterans. The real ones which are forgotten and ignored and the legions of fake ones who somehow fool everyone such as the media and the government.

    He also tears into the VA , dismantles the myth of agent orange ptsd and many others
     
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  3. Soupnazi

    Soupnazi Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes I have to add something.

    Stolen Valor is also the name given to a law passed a few years ago.

    The law itself was influenced by the book by B.G. Burkett.

    It was always illegal to impersonate a member of the military by fraudulently wearing the uniform or medals. However as Burkett points out in his book these laws were often ignored by authorities such as the FBI simply because it seemed rather trivial and they were overworked and understaffed trying to solve serious crimes such as robbery or whatever.

    The new law strengthened the penalties for such fraud and required the FBI to take such violations more seriously.

    Birkett has a website showing some of the fakers who have been prosecuted under this law.

    - - - Updated - - -

    To answer your question I do not know specifically what the law says but no.

    a costume party is not a case of fraud after all everyone knows that everyone there is dressed in a make believe manner.

    The law applies to people attempting to commit fraud by actually claiming to be what they are dressed up as.
     
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  4. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    Countering stolen valor...
    :salute:
    Purple Heart Would Receive More Protection With New Law
    Jan 17, 2017 | This year, a piece of legislation is expected to come up in Congress that could help protect the Purple Heart.
    See also:

    Symbols of Sacrifice Should Not Be for Sale
    Dec 20, 2016 | Rep. Paul Cook is a Republican from California and a retired Marine Corps colonel. He serves on veterans affairs, armed services and foreign affairs committees in the U.S. House of Representatives.
     
  5. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    Dindu Nuffin tries to claim he's a war hero...
    [​IMG]
    NY Man Accused of Fabricating Decorated Green Beret Military Career
    15 Dec 2017 - Guardians of the Green Beret said they started probing Wright after receiving tips from Internet users.
     
  6. willburroughs

    willburroughs Well-Known Member

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    The Stolen Valor Act of 2005 was deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. It is NOT against the law to impersonate a member of the military.
    Two subsequent acts (2012-Heck and 2013-Obama) make it a crime to profit (money/property) from impersonating, but not against the law to be an azshole walking around with uniform and medals you did not earn.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
  7. willburroughs

    willburroughs Well-Known Member

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    The Stolen Valor Act of 2005 was deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. It is NOT against the law to impersonate a member of the military.
    Two subsequent acts (2012-Heck and 2013-Obama) make it a crime to profit (money/property) from impersonating, but not against the law to be an azshole walking around with uniform and medals you did not earn.
     
  8. gorfias

    gorfias Well-Known Member

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    How about this one: went to a catered Veteran's dinner. One of the people there was not pretending to have ever been in the military. No, he was Vietnam war protestor and believes he has a right to attend the event as it was his war too. Your thoughts?
     
  9. scarlet witch

    scarlet witch Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    He should have been tarred and feathered
     
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  10. gorfias

    gorfias Well-Known Member

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    Can't stop laughing :)
     
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  11. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    Stolen Valor now actually has some legal definitions. And it is not just wearing the uniform.

    If you are claiming to be a veteran (in or out of a uniform) and are using a fraudulent claim to gain some kind of benefit with that (discounts at stores, preference in hiring, etc), then Stolen Valor does indeed apply, and you can be prosecuted for it (essentially fraud).

    The next is if the individual is a veteran, but claims to have gotten awards they never earned, or served in units that they did not then they can be charged with making false-fraudulent statements. I have even seen at least 2 on active duty get into big trouble over that.

    But just walk around in parts of a uniform, most of us could not care less. Knock yourself out, just please be honest and if somebody asks if you served, say "No".
     
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  12. Old Man Fred

    Old Man Fred Well-Known Member

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    I've never been particularly offended by Stolen Valor, as those boys usually give you a real good laugh.

    It's a drop in the bucket compared to the fraudulent "veteran" charities that operate throughout the country. Several years back myself and probably 50 or so other vets showed up on the National Day of Service to help do maintenance around "transitional housing for homeless veterans".

    Turns out that out of 4 city blocks of low income housing, only one building was actually for veterans.
     
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  13. Thingamabob

    Thingamabob Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    The answer is "no" and I don't care what "the official policy" has to say on the subject. I am a war veteran myself and my opinion is that as long as the guy doesn't spread lies about war then I don't care if he impersonates a soldier. What I absolutely hate is when impersonators and even real veterans play up the "love it or leave it" crap and how the U.S. has been bringing Democracy to other countries. So for me, if someone needs to fake who he is in order to feel better about himself then that's OK just as long as he keeps his mouth shut and doesn't' play the hero.
     
  14. Thingamabob

    Thingamabob Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    What crap. How many people reading this have no scar? And what difference does it make if you got that scar in the military or falling out of a tree in your own backyard? This hero crap is only cheap propaganda for people (and country) with an inferiority complex.
     
  15. Crownline

    Crownline Banned at Members Request

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    If it’s just a costume for a private party, I couldn’t care less. If it’s someone out looking for someone to pay for their meal or drinks, that’s totally wrong. But here is a little hint, I was in the US army from ‘88-‘92. Even back then you didn’t fly commercially in uniform, you didn’t go out to dinner off post in uniform, you didn’t even go grocery shopping off post in uniform because you were a potential target. About the most you could do was stop and get gas on your way to or from duty. Unless you are near some sort of event that would require people to be in uniform, bumping into someone at random in uniform is suspect.
     
  16. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    It all depends also. If you are talking about the duty uniform, that is generally true.

    Many years ago I was in Vegas and wanted to see a show. But it had a dress code, and a suit and tie was required. Like many in the military I did not have one, so I wore my Dress Blues (which is actually equivalent to a tux when it comes to dress code). And even though I had already bought my ticket, the guy at the door refused to let me in!

    Thankfully the manager walked by and basically told him he was an idiot, and allowed me to enter. He even had the waitress give me a free drink for the hassle. And on many other social occasions over the years I have worn my uniform. I actually did not get around to buying a suit until right after I got out.
     

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