What Cars do you have?

Discussion in 'Other Off-Topic Chat' started by XLR8TR, Nov 20, 2011.

  1. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of longitudinal-mount engines in FWD cars...Chrysler's LH cars, the Renault/AMC Medallion, all non-AWD Subarus, and I recall Audis.
     
  2. mikezila

    mikezila New Member

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    i did not know that! maybe becasue those are all low volume cars...heck, i didnt know Subaru could build something w/o AWD....
     
  3. Foolardi

    Foolardi Well-Known Member

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    I find that Porshe's disinclination to use a V-8 as a wise
    choice.The 6 cyclinder engine is a work of wonder.It's what
    my RUNE Motorcycle has.And my previous Valykrie Tourer had.
    It's Unquestionably THE best Touring Motorcycle engine on the planet.
    Thus the Goldwing and it's Zenith stature as premieur Touring Motorcycle
    of legend.V-8 is heavy and clunky and often highly inefficient.
    Often wastefull as the 5.o Mustang proved.
    In fact,I prefer my little 4 banger {2.o litre} 4 cylinder EVO to
    other cars.However I love the sound of a Allison Aircraft engine or
    Rolls Royce 12 cylinder.I would like to have a 12 cylinder car.
    Call me difficult.I find convention the Mother of Frank Zapa's
    ire.
     
  4. XLR8TR

    XLR8TR New Member

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    After around 4-cylinders...the amount of cylinders you have really doesn't matter. Its all about displacement. I can have a 4 cylinder 5.0L engine (each cylinder would be providing enormous displacement) or I can have a 12 cylinder 2.0L engine...in which case each cylinder would be tiny. However ultimately...if I had two engines of equal displacement but with different amounts of cylinders, I could theoretically achieve the same amount of power from both. However...other things start to account such as weight...more complexity, smoothness of acceleration...etc.
     
  5. Foolardi

    Foolardi Well-Known Member

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    You are treating Power as if it's relative.Or can be compared
    to Horsepower and therefore speed.Torque is Pulling Power.
    Torque has to be acheived before Horsepower can be acheived.
    Then there's weight.How much power does it take to pull that weight.
    Horsepower means how much unit of work a horse can manage.
    One horsepower means a horse can work or pull a load for one minute.
    When the horse pulls the same load for 2 minutes,it is 2 horsepower.
    Or expending one minute of horsepower energy.
    Creating H.P. is not as easy as it seems.For an internal combustion
    engine many factors are involved.Revs per minute and the size of the
    powerplant in regard to the thing being asked to do the work {engine}
    and the weight of the venicle.Weight is of key importance.
    That is why a Rolls Royce 12 cylinder allison engine is awesome in a
    Unlimited Hydro race boat but not so spectacular in a heavy Rolls Royce
    car.
     
  6. Leo2

    Leo2 Well-Known Member

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    LOL, I stand (sit?) corrected. But still nearly half a century after the Europeans. :mrgreen:

    Unnecessarily complicated - extra galleries required in the block, etc.. Pushrod engines are prehistoric design, and are prone to valve timing variation at high rpm. How many pushrod, current formula one engines do you know of? :)
     
  7. syukranjz

    syukranjz Banned

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    Proton Persona Elegance 1.6
     
  8. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    Low volume?! The LH car (Concorde, Intrepid, 300M) was Chrysler's flagship from 1993 to 2004!
     
  9. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    No, no extra galleries in the block...IIRC, they oil through the pushrods. Just needs a couple more oil drain holes.

    I know little about F1 bneyond the fact I have no interest whatsoever in it. However, I DO know that the highest specific output of ANY engine (over 1000HP/litre) is from a Hemi-head 2-valve pushrod engine!
     
  10. mikezila

    mikezila New Member

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    i can count on my thumbs how many of those i've ever seen, and i was in the in the auto transport business for 7 years....in SE Michigan.
     
  11. liberalminority

    liberalminority Well-Known Member

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    that is very true, the ls1 engine in the z28 blew its push rods after 100k miles on the odometer

    had to rebuild the engine, put bigger cam and heads in

    think it has something to do with the oiling destribution
     
  12. clarkatticus

    clarkatticus New Member

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    Citroen made FWD cars in the 30's. DeSoto, later bought by Chyrsler, sold the first true production hemi in America, I believe a 333, very rare. Push rod hemi's are indeed problematic but in a big block V-8, but they have a surplus of HP and torque. Engines are basically just air movers, the faster they move the air, the faster the move the car. BMW is making inroads with valve timing and maximizing the HP in their power plants, but reliability under stress is a problem. Mitsubishi started the multi valve OHC systems in the 80's and still leads the pack with power to weight ratio (Evo's) but Honda is much more reliable.
     
  13. Leo2

    Leo2 Well-Known Member

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    Please let me know the make and model of this production pushrod engine which produces a reliable 1,000 bhp/litre without being blown, and on nitro, will you? :)

    I wasn't referring to oil galleries, I was referring to the extra chambers for the pushrods to cross over in the head. If you are going to have a pushrod ,cross flow, hemispherical cylinder head with opposed valves, the rocker arms have to be operated by angled pushrods.

    Pushrods suffer from all sorts of problems at high engine speeds, not least of which are flexion, causing erratic valve timing. Which is one of the reasons most high performance engines are OHC, or preferably, DOHC.

    Actually the most accurate valve timing is provided by desmodromic valve actuation, as used by Ducati.
     
  14. Leo2

    Leo2 Well-Known Member

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    Actually it was not Mitsubishi who introduced multivalve OHC engines (in the 1980s), but Peugeot in 1912. Both the pre-WW2 Bentley and the Bugatti used multivalve OHC engines, and Cosworth, BMW, Ferrari, Triumph, and Honda all made multivalve engines in the 1970s. By the mid 1980s, both Honda and Toyota, as well as a number of European manufacturers had multivalve engines in their production line-up. Mitsubishi was just one of many.

    And the six-cylinder multivalve BMW engines are amongst the most reliable high performance engines on the market. The current production 3 litre engine producing something like 320 bhp without any fuss.
     
  15. liberalminority

    liberalminority Well-Known Member

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    would agree the BMW engines are reliable but the computer systems that control the engines may need work, a friend with a 750 had problems with the computer just a year or two in with the car

    while european and japan automobile engines are very reliable i still fancy an american muscle car because they are big and make alot of noise when the engine is revved which impresses the ladies and gentlemen nearby.
     
  16. Leo2

    Leo2 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I agree that the seven series, in particular, relies too heavily upon computerisation to do everything, and is overly complicated. 'My' five series is complex, but relatively simple compared to a seven. The seven does a lot of unnecessarily complex 'luxury' stuff - all depending upon microprocessors - and it practically knocks you up in the morning with tea and toast. :mrgreen:

    And I had a good laugh at the muscle car noises impressing the lads and lasses. But not this lad - I am into the concept of the silent sports car. :-D
     
  17. Foolardi

    Foolardi Well-Known Member

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    Yet the Harley Davidson V-Twin or TC88 or TC95 models are pushrod
    design.The reason I'd never own a Harley.Maybe their V-rod.
    They use the older,more clunky,out dated Pushrod design.Which means
    NO Overhead Camshaft which produces better and more efficient
    H.P. I prefer DOHC or Overhead Cam,Double OHC.
    OHV or Over Head Valve vs. OHC or Over Head Cam.
    OHV have more moving parts and can suffer valve float.
    Pushrod design may be a more simpler approach to
    cam timing but also produces far les Rev's which is what makes horsepower.
     
  18. RevAnarchist

    RevAnarchist New Member Past Donor

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    Ha ha yes I suppose. I have spent nearly 3k on it and its still isnt running. A con ripped me of (which isnt that easy) and said he did a rebuild. He got busted for moving tons of weed later in the day after I picked up the thing. It had been gunked off and a few gaskets replaced but there was no rebuild. Then the water pump went out, which is an involved process to put it in. Unlike a normal car one has to take out the timing gears and chain (I think its chain) and being a transverse engine its not easy to get to, MANY parts had to be removed to fix it. This guy wasnt a con but he was stupid mistiming the car and bending the valves! Its a long story none of it pretty! I despise that thing~

    RA
     
  19. RevAnarchist

    RevAnarchist New Member Past Donor

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    I think you are getting your terms mixed up. Venturis are usually carb parts, well the holes where the air goes through. A 4bbl has 4 (usually), and it speeds up the air. You may be speaking of the venturi effect ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venturi_effect basically when air going through a constriction speeds up.

    Cowl induction like on the old chevelle uses a low/high pressure air space right in front of the windshield, when it opens the air is rammed in the carb to provide a little boost and cool air which improves the mix ratio a bit, cooler air can hold more O2 eh? And ram air stuffs more air which we all know is a mix on nitrogen over 70% and Oxygen and trace amounts or rare gasses.

    RevA
     
  20. RevAnarchist

    RevAnarchist New Member Past Donor

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    You are all a bit off target about the hemi !

    http://www.allpar.com/mopar/hemi/ardun.html

    Rev A
     
  21. RevAnarchist

    RevAnarchist New Member Past Donor

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    The mustang V-8's are legendary! The 289's and then the mighty big block Cobra Jets etc to the awesome 429 cammer then back again small block brand new all alum five liter 440 hp Coyote engined mustang that is the king of pony cars again. I love the sound of supercharged American big block or even a shelby supersnake at full song which will have 800 freaking horsepower in 2012! There is nothing wrong with little 4 bangers. They can be pretty impressive especially with direct injection and supercharging, but still they suck hind titty compared to modern V-8s under 50,000 dollar cars. However car of all cars I would like to own a original 427 AC FORD Cobra and throw in a Paxton inter-cooled supercharger for around 700-800 hp.

    Rev A
     
  22. Foolardi

    Foolardi Well-Known Member

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    Which is the bane of performance.Sound.Which is why Harley's
    suck.The sound good,but that's about it.
    Short of a Funny Car or top fuel dragster,sound means little.
    Indy cars sound whiny but really produce usable H.P.
    Those Big V-8's are coming back but not for long.They are gas
    guzzlers.Then again so is my EVO { 4 banger } when I goose the
    pedal. Probably the best roadster ever was a 427 Cobra.I believe they
    even had a 289 cobra.With that famous huge side exhaust.
    I had a VTX 1800 Honda w/ Hardkrome Sideburner exhaust. {4 in.}
    Very similar to a Ford cobra roadster { rollbar model }.
     
  23. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    You are the world's least-observant person or you are dishonest. Chrysler sold 150,000+ LH cars per year (and I recall topped 250,000 a couiple times) from 1993 to 2004. I see them DAILY and have for years.
     
  24. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    Might want to grab an extinguisher, dude, your trousers are burning!
     
  25. Jarlaxle

    Jarlaxle Well-Known Member

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    Please quote EXACTLY where I specified that it was a production engine (though it's based very heavily on one), naturally aspirated, or gasoline-fueled. Fact: the most powerful competition engines in the world are the Chrysler Hemis powering Top Fuel dragsters and Fuel Funny Cars, making somewhere around 8500HP from 8.2 litres. Those engines are directly based on the 426 Hemi.

    Not really...they usually are, but it isn't required. No reason a hemi-head can't have the pushrods exactly parallel.

    Yeah, that's why pushrod engines have been spinning 9000+RPM for decades! Keith Black built one forty years ago...powering the last Superbird to race NASCAR, it was a tiny 305ci (5 litre) engine, competing against 7+ litre engines. Nicknamed "the lunchbox", it made about 700HP, but required gearing the car very deeply. To run at the speed required to win a NASCAR race, it would be spinning between 10,500 and 12,000RPM for about three hours. The car led for about 80 laps (pulling ahead with every lap!), eventually finishing seventh after losing time due to repairing damage from a sideswipe. Keith Black's "lunchbox" never missed a beat. Unless there was a caution flag out, the engine was revving over 9500RPM, and it sang between 10,500 and 12,000RPM for most of the race.
     

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