Which part of the US will succumb, to SEA LEVEL RISE, first?

Discussion in 'Environment & Conservation' started by bobgnote, Jul 31, 2012.

  1. Farnsworth

    Farnsworth Active Member

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2010
    Messages:
    678
    Likes Received:
    174
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Coal use in Asia expanded right along with the export driven economies in the last 20 years, keeping coal exactly where it was as a percentage of world energy use, around 40%. Note this is 40% of a big increase in energy use worldwide, not to be confused with the 'same amounts' of coal used as 20 years ago.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2020
  2. AFM

    AFM Well-Known Member Past Donor

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2014
    Messages:
    31,263
    Likes Received:
    6,853
    Trophy Points:
    113
    China's use of coal has risen proportionally and Germany is replacing their nuclear power stations with lignite (the "dirtiest" form of coal) power generation.
     
  3. Zorro

    Zorro Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    Messages:
    48,413
    Likes Received:
    28,692
    Trophy Points:
    113
    It's risen 400 feet over the last 20,000 years, so current rate of rise is 1/2 the rate of the last 200 centuries, it's slowed down quite a bit.
     
    AFM and Sunsettommy like this.
  4. Jack Hays

    Jack Hays Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2020
    Messages:
    199
    Likes Received:
    66
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Gender:
    Male
    They're not worried in the Maldives.


    “Sinking” Maldives Clear Forests, Pave Beaches, To Construct Four New Airports For Future Tourism!

    By P Gosselin on 20. November 2020

    Share this...
    [​IMG][​IMG]
    Despite all the money-generating gloomy predictions of sinking islands, we reported in 2013 on how the Maldives was planning to build 30 new luxury hotels for future tourists.

    [​IMG]

    The resort island of Landaa Giraavaru (Baa atoll), photo by: Frédéric DucarmeCC BY-SA 4.0.

    Underwater in 7 years?

    We recall how in 2012, the former President of the Maldives Islands, Mohamed, Nasheed said: “If carbon emissions continue at the rate they are climbing today, my country will be underwater in seven years.”

    4 new airports!

    Well, today the islands have not gone underwater and remains popular with tourists like never before. And to help with the job of ferrying the 1.7 million (2019) tourists to and from the resort islands, the Maldives have recently opened 4 new airports, according to German site Aero here! . . .
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2020 at 9:58 AM
    DennisTate and AFM like this.
  5. DennisTate

    DennisTate Well-Known Member Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    Messages:
    24,901
    Likes Received:
    1,704
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male

    Very interesting!

    If The Abraham Peace Accord goes in the direction that I am hoping it will then then might be correct. We are living in a time period when it is theoretically possible to add a comparable amount of H2O to desert regions through mega-scale desalination of ocean water as is cracking and sliding off the land based Greenland Ice Sheet plus the world's glaciers......... minus.... the amount of H2O being ADDED to the central region of Antarctica.


    After the Abraham Peace Accord turn deserts green...


    "At a symposium of the Union of Geodesy and geophysics, Dr. Pyyotor Shoumsky reported that the south polar ice cap was growing at a minimum rate of 293 cubic miles of ice annually. To put that number in perspective, Lake Erie contains only 109 cubic miles of water. Thus, a volume of ice forms on top of the existing ice at Antarctica each year which is almost three times the volume of water in Lake Erie!" (Expanded Discussion of The HAB Theory, Gershom Gale, Expanded Discussion on the HAB Theory.)

    "Let us consider Antarctica for a moment.
    We have already seen that it is big. It has a land area of 5.5
    million square miles, and is presently covered by something in excess of seven million cubic miles of ice weighing an estimated 19 quadrillion tons (19 followed by 15 zeros). What worries the theorists of earth-crust displacement is that this vast ice-cap is remorselessly increasing in size and weight:'at the rate of 293 cubic miles of ice each year--almost as much as if Lake Ontario were frozen solidly annually and added to it." (Graham Hancock, Fingerprints of the Gods, page 480)


    How much longer will central Antarctica save our coastal communities?


     
  6. DennisTate

    DennisTate Well-Known Member Donor

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2012
    Messages:
    24,901
    Likes Received:
    1,704
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Gender:
    Male
    Anchorage Alaska has the second most extreme tides in the world after the Bay of Fundy. The funnelling effect that the land form of the Bay of Fundy and Anchorage Alaska has on tidal water should cause them to experience the effect of rising ocean levels first.


    Residents of Nova Scotia and New Brunswick are facing a rather simple mathematical problem that forces us to take a rather dim view of a Carbon Tax.

    .... "If average ocean levels rose by eight to ten cms (3 or 4 inches) could high tide...
    ... rise by one meter in the Isthmus of Chignecto in Nova Scotia, Canada?
    This question is logical because the geography of Canada's Bay of Fundy produces the world's highest tides. In my part of Nova Scotia in Guysborough County there is very little funnelling of tidal waters......... so high tide is only about one to one point five meters above low tide.
    In the eastern area of the Bay of Fundy high tide levels are up by ten to fifteen meters."


    Every cubic meter of ocean water that is desalinated and added to the water table of Israel, California, Algeria, Qatar, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Australia, Nevada, South Africa, India or any other nation with lots of desert is really good news for the owners of the real estate along the Bay of Fundy and of Anchorage Alaska that have the second most extreme tides in the world for very similar reasons.

    High tide waters are funnelled by the Bay of Fundy into a more and more narrow area and on top of that......... the Bay of Fundy is over one hundred and seventy miles long so high tide water cannot fully drain back into the ocean before the next high tide waters pile on top of them.


    [​IMG]
     
  7. bringiton

    bringiton Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2016
    Messages:
    6,281
    Likes Received:
    663
    Trophy Points:
    113
    It's more likely to be through large-scale hydrological projects like the Three Gorges dam system in China and the TransAqua project in Africa. Even though recent advances in desalination have made it economically feasible to desalinate seawater for most human uses of fresh water, the feasible scale is still microscopic compared to the natural desalination that occurs through the hydrological cycle. It now costs roughly $0.60/m^3 to desalinate seawater, so desalinating 1km^3 costs $600M. That's impressive, but still too much when we are talking about thousands of km^3/y. We just have to make up our minds to let less fresh water run into the sea and be wasted. The three big barriers to this solution, which would be very beneficial independently of any sea level considerations, are political, not technical or economic:
    1. Watersheds often cross national borders, making it difficult to get agreement to divert natural flows. That is why China conquered and annexed Tibet 60 years ago: they knew they were going to need its water.
    2. Environmentalists oppose dams because they change local ecosystems. I.e., it's OK for beavers to build dams, but not for people.
    3. The prevailing system of private landowning (except in a few places like China, Cuba and Laos) means that the benefits of improved fresh water access via hydrological projects all have to be given away to landowners in return for nothing, making it impossible to finance them.
     

Share This Page