Why nobody wants to join the Army this year

Discussion in 'Warfare / Military' started by Nightmare515, Jul 13, 2022.

  1. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    I would love to take a time machine and force things like this upon the "Greatest Generation".

    Nope, sorry 506th PIR. You can't jump into Normandy because you all have not done your mandatory DoD SHARP and ASAP classes. So take off those parachutes and report to the classroom tomorrow from 0800 until 1800. Only after that will we talk about you actually doing your job.

    Oh, and when you finish the classes, just go to your barracks and do nothing. The DoD ordered us to close the club on base because it encouraged drinking. So if you want a drink, you have to drive out in town to do it. But we will also have your ass if you get a DUI.
     
  2. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    I don't blame them. I'm in the later stages of my career and honestly two things are keeping me in. One I'm a single guy so I can stomach much of the military stressors a bit easier than those with families. Wasn't always the case, I had a family before, long story but I'm single now. If I were still with my family I'd have been gone years ago. Two, I really am holding on for a change. I remember vividly when General Mattis became SecDef and at the stroke of a pen killed most of this nonsense off. We literally cheered when we all got the infamous "increasing lethality" emails from the top of the memo's signed by Mattis.

    Overnight virtually all of this crap was dead, the series of memo's basically stated that anything that doesn't directly have to do with making you a better SOLDIER is over. No more dumb check the block training. No more monthly mandated EO and SHARP classes, etc. If the classes or briefings aren't tied to your MOS and making you more lethal or proficient at your job then it's over. He killed all this crap and we loved it.

    Then low and behold we get the present Administration and the present Sec Def who then rescinds those memo's and reinstates this stuff with a vengeance and adds tons of other social woke crap and forces it down all of our throats. I'm hoping that maybe there will be another dramatic change in the near future. If not then I guess I'll simply go the way of virtually all of my current peers and just retire and become another statistic on their data charts that they will continue to ignore.
     
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  3. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    Oh, and the part I closed the last with is actually a huge pet peeve of mine.

    When I served from 1983 to 1993, the club on base was where it was at. Even a lot of people (especially gals) from out in town would go to the club on base every weekend. Everybody went there, because the environment was safe, the drinks were cheap, and you had a lot of "supervision" if you had too much. Some NCO or Officer would step up and go "Jones, you've had one too many. Here, come with me and I'll walk you back to the barracks". And if the walk was too far, there was on most bases a free shuttle buss that ran from the club to the barracks. It was not unusual on Saturday and Sunday morning for the club parking lot to be full of cars of people who had too much, and walked or took the bus back.

    But now, all the clubs on base are gone. I remember being at Lejeune, and just on Mainside we had 6 of them. An Enlisted Club, an NCO Club, a Staff NCO Club, an Officers Club, a Field Grade Officer Club, and finally an "All Ranks" Club that was open to everybody. And DUIs were rare, because somebody would step in and make sure that everybody got home safe. And because most of us were military and it was on base, it was always safe.

    Fast forward a few decades, and all the clubs on base are now gone. Because according to many they "encouraged drinking". Yeah, right. As if you have to encourage those from 18 to 22 to drink. And now DUIs are a major concern of every command, and in some places it is an epidemic. And we have to give them lessons in things like not leaving their drink, because people spiking the drinks with date rape drugs off-base is a real concern and happens regularly. Or clubs that are dangerous because many in them love little more than to find some drunk servicemember and beating the crap out of them for fun.

    I once wrote an article for "Army Times", that encouraged the opening of clubs on base again, and cited statistics like DUI numbers on the increase as now those that want to go to a club have to drive out in town to go to one. Where they are not supervised and the military has no control over who else might be there. Needless to say, it was rejected.
     
  4. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    Exactly! I miss the days of the O club's and NCO clubs but nope lets take that away from service members as well and increase the DUI's. I was just talking about this with a buddy of mine at lunch last week who is one more great Officer we are losing to retirement because he hates the Army's current trajectory and wants no part of it, his words not mine. We were laughing about the DUI counter that they display on the sign at the main gate. "Days without a DUI incident...2" ALWAYS, it almost never gets above 5 because there are only 5 workdays at once the weekend hits it resets again. We were laughing wondering why the keep that up there, is it supposed to be encouraging or wishful thinking or something? It's embarrassing, I've been here for years and I genuinely don't think I've ever seen it get past 7 days. Hell it's so bad that a couple years ago somebody was so drunk they literally swerved off the road and plowed their truck right through the main gate sign and got it stuck...Not joking, I have a picture of that too lol...And this is not a sign close to the road, this guy drove a good 30 meters or so to Dukes of Hazard his F-150 right through that thing.The most hilarious part was that fact that the DUI counter was still visible in the top of the sign with this truck plowed right through the middle of it lol.

    Soldiers have nowhere to go on post to go relax and socialize with their peers. There is one place that serves alcohol but it closes at 2000 I think and it's not a club it's more like a cafe type deal. I figured out that a lot of Soldiers go to the golf course to drink at their little bar during the months it's open which is a very short time and they are not open very late either.

    We are at a remote base for all intents and purposes. Tiny town, tiny post, and not a whole lot to do in general. The Soldiers all hang out at one particular bar off post and it's ALWAYS trouble in that place and that is where 90% of the DUI's come from. We are one of the "epidemic" Commands when it comes to DUI's. They try to get back on post from that one bar and get caught. The local PD knows that very well and the running gag around here is that if you want to drive drunk in this town do it on a Friday or Saturday night just avoid that one road outside of the unofficial Solider bar because that's where virtually every single cop in this small town sits on those nights.

    This year alone there have been dozens of fights at that bar between locals and service members. Two Soldiers have been shot, one of them from my own unit shot in the leg. And yes unfortunately the predators are out in droves here regarding our female Soldiers. Tiny town, extremely skewed male to female population ratio. Couple young Army girls show up to the bar and bad things sometimes happen, way more often than I'm even comfortable talking about. Give them a place to drink on post so we can take care of them and get them home safe. Soldiers are going to drink, that's what they do, and in a place like this they are REALLY going to drink because they have little else to do. They are either sitting in the barracks room eating pizza and playing video games drinking or out at that bar off post drinking and getting into trouble. I know plenty of folks will say be responsible and get a taxi or an Uber. Well this is a tiny place as i said, no Uber here or MAYBE one dude driving Uber on any given weekend night. And if you want a taxi be prepared to spend $80-$100 for one and wait an hour. Soldiers aren't going to do that, they will take their chances and drive.

    These were all concerns that have been formally discussed with the powers at be here on numerous occasions. We too have encouraged the return of on post facilities for the Soldiers to drink SAFELY. After years of deliberation the powers at be finally made a decision on how to address the problem of Soldiers having little to do here which causes them to drink heavily off post and get in trouble....They are going to build a park on post. Yes a park. Construction starts next summer and no I'm not joking. That is their solution to this problem...Because bored Soldiers prone to drinking heavily after a long day of work would love nothing more than to you know...slide down a slide. You can't make this stuff up.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2023
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  5. Lil Mike

    Lil Mike Well-Known Member

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    I retired in 2009 so I had no idea that NCO Clubs and the like had been shut down Army wide. As you've recounted, that seems like a dumb idea. I have fond memories (mostly) of hanging out at the NCO Club. It was a place that you could actually walk to in order to drink, and stumble back to your barracks when done. That is actually a luxury compared to going down town and of course on post the only riff raff you have to worry about is your own.
     
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  6. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    And now clubs have been gone so long that very few like us are old enough to remember them.

    At almost every base I was on in the 1980s and 1990s, the club was the most popular place to go to, on and off base. We even had terms like the "West Pac Widows Association" and the like for all the gals (single or not) that would flood to them. Many of them looking for a military husband, or just knowing that they had a job, did not use drugs, and were probably clean for a weekend hookup. And most of the gals who were in did not go out in town because it was so much safer on base.

    And it is not just women that are at risk. When I was at Bliss, we had a guy that was roofied and came aware as he was being raped. And my hat is off to him, because at least once a month during the Safety Brief he would get up and tell his story, including the nightmare of ASAP because his drink was spiked with not only regular date rape drugs but cocaine and barbiturates. He literally went through hell, and refused to ever go out to a club in El Paso ever again after that.

    I know that in the 1980s DUIs were pretty damned rare, and almost always married guys that lived out in town. The single ones pretty much stuck on-base for many reasons. And as an NCO myself, over and over they would stress that it was part of my duty to make sure that if somebody had to much to drink that they get back to the barracks safely. And back then, it was not unusual to see the DUI calendar in the double and triple digits, because DUI was so rare. At my first posting we actually once had it reach almost two years. And you are right, today it rarely gets above 7.

    I remember in 2008 when we got a new First Sergeant. And in his first briefing Monday he announced a new alcohol policy in the barracks. Bliss had been going through a rash of deaths and hospitalizations due to drinking, so he announced that we could have no bottle more than a pint of alcohol or a single 6 pack of beer in our room. And the next day he did a room inspection, and my Platoon Sergeant about flipped out because he opened my secretary and found a 750ml bottle of scotch (I did not try to hide it, he knew that was where I kept it from previous inspections). Even though I tried to explain I had bought it the week before and was not planning on replacing it when it was gone. But I was not going to try and either drink it all in one night, or throw it away because of a change that just happened the day before.

    But to give that Top credit, when my Platoon Sergeant started to get bent out of shape because I was obviously breaking the policy, Top stepped in. He asked me my age (I was 43), the cost of the bottle ($30), and how long that lasted me (about two weeks). He then looked at my Platoon Sergeant and said I was an exception and I was allowed to have that. He was worried about the 18 and 19 year old kids that would try to kill a 1.5 liter bottle of $10 booze in a single night or weekend, not the middle aged guy that bought more expensive alcohol and drank responsibly.

    And he had long been my favorite First Sergeant, even though we are both now retired. Because he was hard with his rules, but also understood when they should be bent. And as long as somebody was responsible he would bend them. In our entire Battery, I was the only exemption he allowed to the alcohol policy. In fact, several months later an NCO from another platoon tried to bring me up on charges saying I "smelled like a brewery". I had not had anything to drink, and he was smelling somebody else but he still insisted on dragging me to Top and having charges filed on me. Thankfully Top just laughed and said it could not be me, as he knew I did not drink beer. He knew I was a scotch drinker, and I even invited that NCO to check my room at that time or any time in the future. And he would not find any beer in there ever.

    I still miss the times after work when I would go to the NCO club and hang out with my peers, either inside my unit or other units. Or even the "Mess Nights", another tradition I once tried to do but was told that as it involved alcohol I would not be allowed to organize one.
     
  7. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    Yeah a whole lot of things have changed so fast in the military that even those who remember the military a mere decade ago would hardly recognize the current formation. That's why a lot of these current issues with the Army are difficult for many to grasp because it wasn't like this before. I've had discussions with plenty of people who've served in the past who often try to challenge what I'm saying because they used to serve and it wasn't like that back in the day. I'm like man it wasn't even like this in 2019....let alone 1990. Plenty of folks remember how the military WAS and believe that well obviously a few things have probably changed but overall it's roughly the same Army they left. Nope not even close.

    That's why I try my best to give specific examples of things I'm talking about which often times may come off as long winded. Much of this stuff is so outrageous that many believe it's exaggerated and there is no way it's actually going on in the Army they knew and loved. Oh yeah it is. The DoD has just been making dumb decision after dumb decision for years at this point with no signs of slowing down in sight. A part of me honestly feels like this is intentional and there is a shadow goal the government is trying to reach by drastically downsizing without officially calling it downsizing or something. I just find it hard to fathom that the powers at be are actually THIS stupid.
     
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  8. Grey Matter

    Grey Matter Well-Known Member Donor

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    I hadn't appreciated the magnitude of this sort of BS going on when I first posted my thoughts about recruitment issues in this thread. When I enlisted back in 83 my primary objective was to get away from all my pothead buddies back on the block, learn some real discipline and go work on nukes in W. Germany. I'd tried taking a year of classes at Louisville and hated it and I needed to do something to get the hell on with my life as that second summer was fixin to pass me by after high school.

    Additionally, the military had no problem recruiting folks in the early 80s as the unemployment rate peaked at 10.8% November and December 1982 and the one thing that almost everyone had in common was the benefit of being employed that went along with joining the service. This unemployment and its accompanying recession, I just learned as I was searching for this percentage, was the highest since the Great Depression.

    Much to my dismay, upon finishing training I found myself assigned to stay at Ft. Sill to the one Pershing Battalion located outside of W. Germany. The DoD honored the contract and kept me employed doing nothing. We had a budget that covered on training exercise each Spring to Ft. Chaffee and we were able to get funds to do a handful of on Post exercises each year. But in June 1984 just shy of turning 20, I sat along with the rest of the Battalion in the motor pool and hated it. Battalion just laughed at me as I filled out the form requesting a transfer to real Pershing units.

    Things took a nice turn for the better in 4Q85 when my Battery was tasked with a TDY to the Cape to support a QA/QC live test fire for three rounds off the W. German pads. And the next year we received another TDY gift to support an Air Force mission to develop imaging techniques to locate SS20s by emplacing mockups of them in the terrain around Camp Roberts over in Cali.

    Where I was then in my life I and where the US was at the time, I would of course have done the exact same thing all over again.

    Here in 2023 knowing what I know now it's something I'm having a bit of difficulty figuring out an honest and reliably steady answer regarding whether I would serve again. If I could perhaps qualify to fly fighter jets, it would be on like Donkey Kong regardless of having to wear one of these ridiculous vests. Hell, I'd wear one of these damn things 24/7 if it meant that I got to pilot an F series jet. Flying Apache's or Warthogs would be pretty awesome too. I don't know.

    I'm pretty sure I'd not consider going career, but I respect the hell out of anyone that does. I still view our service Academies as excellent opportunities for those that are able to succeed along such a path. I have very little grasp of what life in the military might look like from an Officers point of view, so that carries a bit of interest for me.

    I seem to recall reading here, I think it may have even been one of your posts, pointing out that an 18 or 19 year old kid today considering joining the military has all kinds of information available to form an opinion about making that decision. I'm not sure to what extent I'd personally take into consideration whatever I might stumble across on this DEI training BS versus what I would likely weight more which would be whatever I could ferret out about the MOS options themselves.

    Were I to find info like what's available in this thread, it wouldn't land in the Pro column to get me in. I've not a lot of patience even for HSE lectures much less DEI lectures. I can definitely see how this sort of stuff creates huge retention issues. As I mentioned though, some of the other things mentioned in this thread would personally be equal or maybe even greater check boxes for me to get out than this dirt stupid DEI crap.
     
  9. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    Not just the Army, military wide.

    As I said, back in the 80s there were 6 of them just on Mainside Lejeune. And there were likely up to a dozen more in other areas of the base. Today, the closest thing I could find was the bowling alley.

    And it was the same thing at Camp Pendleton. There were several Mainside, and each sub-camp on the base had at least one as well. Today, all gone.
     
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  10. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    It's funny you mentioned this story as I was having a discussion about this very thing regarding alcohol in the barracks with our CSM a few months ago. They have the same policy you described here, no more than a 6 pack if you're over 21 and if your roommate isn't then you have to keep the booze in your own room and not in the fridge which is common to both rooms. Yeah these newer barracks are nice, they each have their own actual room with a common kitchen and bathroom. The problem is these are 18 and 19 year old kids as you said. Kids who can and will absolutely kill an entire 5th of whiskey or a 12 pack of beer in one night if they can. Even for the 21 year olds in the barracks they aren't just going to drink 6 beers...and what happens when they run out of their ration of beer, they go drive to the Shoppette or Class Six and buy more. And they're driving while drunk on their previous 6 beers. I get what the policy is trying to do but as we've stated before these Soldiers are going to drink. They are not going to "not drink" just because CSM says they can only have 6 in their room at any given time. They will just go get more which in my opinion increases the risk.

    I've always argued just let them have their booze in the barracks. Yes they will get rowdy and act up and many will likely show up to formation puking on Monday morning but at least they are where we can see them. Back when I was enlisted before crossing over I would always buy my platoon booze whenever I was on CQ shift at the barracks. I told my squad leaders who lived with them in the barracks they could do the same thing for all our guys, I didn't care how old they were. Controversial take I know handing out booze to "underage" Soldiers but my philosophy was and is simple. For one back when I was an NCO this was during the troop surge and we had just gotten back from the most recent Afghanistan deployment and in my book if you can spend over a year in the front line infantry in Afghanistan getting shot at and taking IED's then you are old enough to drink a beer I don't care how old you are. And two, regardless of how I personally felt about number 1 the reality is that is the exact philosophy all of my teenage Soldiers had themselves and they were going to go find booze regardless of what I or anybody else thought and the legality of it be damned. So I'd rather they did it in the barracks with their squad mates and NCO's who could keep an eye on them. I'd rather they do that then go to some house party off post and get piss drunk and get in trouble.

    Let the kids party it up in the barracks, that's what we were allowed to do when I was a Private. And back then we PARTIED, these kids nowadays are boring they never get in trouble in the barracks. It was Private protocol back then that we would be in formation on Sunday mornings in the barracks parking lot getting ripped apart by 1SG's for whatever antics we pulled in their barracks the night before. If we weren't getting skull dragged on Sunday mornings then we had a boring weekend lol. But they "tolerated" us acting a fool like that because we were all contained in one building where we couldn't get in actual trouble. And on Monday mornings when inevitably a couple Soldiers were missing from formation their Squad leaders had to simply bolt out of formation and run across to street and drag dumbass Private Nightmare out of bed for PT. Leaders knew where we were and knew if Soldiers weren't standing tall in formation they are simply across the street 99% of the time, not passed out somewhere in town or in jail or worse.

    I tried to sell that to CSM, he wasn't having it though. This is a very hard post for young Soldiers. To put it bluntly this place absolutely sucks and it's extremely boring. I love it here because I'm old and boring and I love old and boring now. Private me would have probably went AWOL or started a riot if I was stationed here as my first assignment. All these kids do is drink because they have nothing else to do and they hate this place. And since they can't drink anywhere on post they go off post and drink too much and get in trouble. I say just let them drink it up in the barracks. Yes 1SGG's and CSM you are still going to get phone calls every weekend from the Soldiers acting up but at least then you'd know where they were and you could just go to the barracks and jack them up instead of having to go drag them out of the police station. Your 19 year old Privates are all going to be piss drunk tonight on Saturday anyway, might as well let them do so in their own building so at least you know where they are and they can't get into any real trouble.
     
  11. Grey Matter

    Grey Matter Well-Known Member Donor

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    This is pretty tedious stuff. Briefer was a white guy and a civilian would be my guess. A civilian, not a veteran - a guy that had never even served, because I find it very unlikely and hard to believe any vet would have had the ignorance to call you out on this sort of issue. The lack of respect is downright incredible, and this poor dumb bastard probably didn't even realize he was being disrespectful.
     
  12. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    Or at a club 300 meters away. Where there are going to be at least some NCOs that will see they had too much and drag their asses back to their room before they get alcohol poisoning. I had to do that more than once myself.

    Hell, it even happened to me once. I was in the middle of a divorce, and got absolutely smashed. Two Lance Corporals actually dragged me home. And the funniest part was right after we walked outside into the cool night air, I made a hard left turn and threw up in the bushes. Right in front of our Colonel and Sergeant Major. Their only concern was that I was alright (one explained my divorce), and that they were getting me back home safely. Back then, we watched out for each other, not just upper ranks down, but lower ranks up. And a month later I got called in to see the Sergeant Major, and he was relieved that for me that was a one time thing that was not repeated afterwards. If I had been starting to develop a problem, they likely would have had me shipped off for detox.

    Back in the 1980s and 1990s, at least the Marines had a firm "no alcohol in the barracks" policy. There was no drinking in the rooms, it was always around others at the club so you could be supervised. And the leadership only stepped in if it was starting to be a problem. Lance Corporal Johnson got smashed this weekend, a lot of laughs. But when they see LCpl Johnson getting smashed every weekend for a month or two, then leadership was going to step in and make sure there is not a more serious problem there.

    And that was also the era where the drinking age on base was 18. Yes, they drank. But most of them drank fairly responsibly. And we learned which ones did not, and sometimes even barred them from the club on base if they were a problem. Somebody had to have a real problem if they were permanently kicked out of the club on base, and most of those were the kinds that did not even finish their first enlistment.

    Hell, I even remember laughing at the guys after a weekend off showing up to PT still drunk and puking. Or showing up drunk to guard formation on 11 November after the Marine Corps Ball. We would just look at who was the most drunk and sober, and adjust the first postings to ensure the sober ones were on duty and those still drunk went straight to the rack for another few hours to finish sleeping it off. But that kind of behavior was also not actually tolerated "on duty". And most learned that having to do PT while hungover was a damned good reason to control their drinking. Because in the Corps, there was no "Ability Group Run", the entire platoon ran as a platoon, in about a B level AGR pace. And there was no falling out, if you stepped out to puke you had better catch up fast or there would be hell to pay. Forcing guys to run at a 7 minute mile pace for 3 to 5 miles when they are hungover is a damned good incentive to show them why that was a bad idea.
     
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  13. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    That right there is the problem that the military has found itself in. Recruiters have to try to sell more "cool" stuff to put in the Pro column to outweigh the negative stuff these kids know about the military. And it's not working. It's primarily the internet and social media. If you don't know someone personally who is in the military to ask what service is actually like then it takes only a few moments on social media to find a whole bunch of prior service members who have no issues telling everybody.

    Case in point, Twitter. The Army has an official Twitter handle and it posts stuff every once and awhile. I think it was last year on Veterans Day they made the fatal mistake of posting a question like "Soldiers and Veterans, how has the Army served you?" They got RIPPED APART in the comments section. Thousand of replies from former and active service members and family members sharing everything they dislike about the Army. Even to this day whenever that Army Twitter account posts something it just gets ripped apart. For example last week I was looking up what the current Army recruiting commercials look like as part of this threads discussion and I stumbled across a few Twitter accounts who had posted the video, including the official DoD handle. Once again, brutal.

    The most recent commercial is pretty decent, a nice throwback to how these commercials used to look and even when posting something "good" the comments are brutal. For every "thank you for your service" type comment there are like 5 harsh responses. "Oh we must be going to war it's nothing but white men in this one for the first time in years". "Not so inclusive now are you that **** is about to hit the fan". "Whats wrong Army? Couldn't find enough purple haired lesbians?" "Men don't fall for this, they've done nothing but piss on straight white men for years and now they want you back because they can't find anybody. Take it from a Soldier in here, don't go". Etc, etc.

    They can't disable the comments when they post because then it just looks even worse. And since Elon has opened Twitter back up folks are now free to rip on the official DoD handles whenever they want. If you have access to Twitter go take a look for yourself, see what happens whenever the Army posts something on there. Yesterday a former service member posted a letter that was sent to him by the DoD asking if he wanted to come back as he was discharged for refusing the COVID shot. Apparently the DoD has begun sending those letters out to a lot of folks who were discharged for not taking the shot. If you're bored on a Saturday night grab some popcorn and go read those comments. They are BRUTAL.

    And this is the "world" of the 18/19 year old kid nowadays. They live in social media land. The Army can't compete with that, no matter what they try to do on social media they get ripped apart. No matter how much "positive" recruiters try it gets drowned out by all the negative that is on social media where their recruiting pool lives. The military dug itself into a nasty hole trying to pull this DEI crap and I honestly don't see how they are going to get out of it. People are pissed and they aren't going to let the Army forget it did this and are doing everything they can to make sure everyone knows.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2023
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  14. Nightmare515

    Nightmare515 Ragin' Cajun Staff Member Past Donor

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    No actually he wasn't, he was one of our 1SG's but there's a catch. He had a script. This was during the very first one of these readiness days after it was mandated years ago.

    Back then when they were first figuring all this out the units were sent direct guidance on what we had to talk about and OPORD's were published from way up the chain which included scripts or key points on what the briefer had to say. For this readiness day big Army reached out to a bunch of minority Soldiers and asked them to share their stories of discrimination in the Army. They asked some to come and give a recorded testimony about it that they could publish on social media. There is a video on youtube right now of this very day. One of our own Senior NCO's in my unit took them up on that and gave a long winded completely ridiculous testimony about how the Army is racist as hell and hates him because he's black. It was posted to one of the official Army websites or something and then uploaded to youtube. His "testimony" about how all the white people in the unit hate him because he's black became a mandatory viewing requirement as part of that days readiness training. All Soldiers had to watch it and report to their leadership that they did which is why it's on youtube.

    I won't direct you to the video primarily because I'd like to keep some form of anonymity. If folks see the video and figure out who the guy is then figuring out who I am in real life could be done if one had enough skill or cared enough since I know the guy. But the video is real, I have the raw video on my phone but I don't know what it was called when they uploaded it on youtube. Search "black army Soldier discrimination speech" or something maybe and eventually you'd find it.

    But back to the briefer. Minority Soldiers were directed to go tell this 1SG their so called discrimination stories because he was designated as the unfortunate briefer for the days events for his Company. So he hears the stories of the two lazy clowns I talked about earlier. On his briefing sheet it said he would discuss the stories of the minority Soldiers and then if there were any more minorities in the class to ask them to share any personal experiences as well. I'm not in a "Company" so I just picked a random Company to go sit in for the briefs and happened to pick his. All the Companies were giving the same brief at the same time. I being the only black officer in the whole unit just so happened to be sitting in his particular class so he figured he would ask me.

    Being completely honest here my outburst was two fold. For one I just really couldn't stand that 1SG, he had been a royal pain in my ass for months by that time and I had to give way more attention to his Company than I ever should have because he was completely incompetent and had no business being a 1SG. He actually wasn't one, he was a frocked E-7 but still he was arguably one of the worst I've ever served with and I'm not joking. Plus he had an open disdain for all of us at my echelon and had no problem running around trash talking us to both subordinate leaders and Soldiers alike. I sat in their particular brief because they always need extra eyes because they screw everything up in that Company. So in an admittedly unprofessional manner unbecoming an officer of my rank and position I chose that moment to make him look like a jackass in front of everybody.

    And two I really was pissed about the whole brief because I hate racism of any kind. And if I can use my skin color to my advantage in this current system that calls me a victim by flipping it around and calling those who promote racism against white people racists themselves then I will every chance I get. That 1SG was one of those people who I think actually believed that self hating white guilt garbage about himself so I made a point to make him look stupid for that as well to hopefully make him think twice about it.

    I mean lets be real here. This guy is a white 1SG, I outrank the hell out of him and he salutes me and calls me Sir. No not because of official military protocol to where even LT's are called Sir by CSM's. I'm "actual" Sir to 1SG's at his level. Yet this dummy really thought it was smart to stand there and ask ME of all people how discriminated I am in the unit then argue with me when I say I'm not...He was doing it to piss me off, he did that all the time by making snarky remarks and one liners whenever he was around.

    But in his defense no he didn't come up with that whole thing. It will literally mandated in an OPORD that he do that. If I wasn't in there he would have picked one of the Soldiers, there was a black Private in that Company at the time if I remember correctly. But unfortunately for him I was in there and he picked me which was a terrible idea lol....
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2023
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