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Thread: Obama is Killing Trees, Animals & Forests

  1. Default Obama is Killing Trees, Animals & Forests

    Everyday I see expensive TV advertisements saying "Save Trees", "Save Forests", "Save Animals".

    But money printing from Obama and his supporters is feeding useless people because of which World resources are in serious trouble. As the human population increases Forests, Trees and animals are at serious risk of disappearing and getting extinct. Already there is less food and inflation is soaring high.

    Related..

    http://dangerousmother.com/treekillobama.html

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by AllAmerican View Post
    Everyday I see expensive TV advertisements saying "Save Trees", "Save Forests", "Save Animals".

    But money printing from Obama and his supporters is feeding useless people because of which World resources are in serious trouble. As the human population increases Forests, Trees and animals are at serious risk of disappearing and getting extinct. Already there is less food and inflation is soaring high.

    Related..

    http://dangerousmother.com/treekillobama.html
    Strip mining for tar sands and oil shale destroys forests..............

  3. Exclamation

    We got a buggly problem...

    Spread by Trade and Climate, Bugs Butcher America's Forests
    December 07, 2016 — In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it's easy to miss one of the tree's nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.
    The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Scientists say they already are driving some tree species toward extinction and are causing billions of dollars a year in damage — and the situation is expected to worsen. “They are one of the few things that can actually eliminate a forest tree species in pretty short order — within years,'' said Harvard University ecologist David Orwig as he walked past dead hemlocks scattered across the university's 5.8-square-mile research forest in Petersham.


    A dead hemlock tree is seen at Harvard University's research forest in Petersham, Massachusetts

    This scourge is projected to put 63 percent of the country's forest at risk through 2027 and carries a cost of several billion dollars annually in dead tree removal, declining property values and timber industry losses, according to a peer-reviewed study this year in Ecological Applications. That examination, by more than a dozen experts, found that hundreds of pests have invaded the nation's forests, and that the emerald ash borer alone has the potential to cause $12.7 billion in damage by 2020.


    The preserved remains of an Asian longhorned beetle, found in Worcester, Massachusetts

    Threat of globalization

    Insect pests, some native and others from as far away as Asia, can undermine forest ecosystems. For example, scientists say, several species of hemlock and almost 20 species of ash could nearly go extinct in the coming decades. Such destruction would do away with a critical sponge to capture greenhouse gas emissions, shelter for birds and insects, and food sources for bears and other animals. Dead forests also can increase the danger of catastrophic wildfires. Today's connected world enables foreign invaders to cross oceans in packing materials or on garden plants, and then reach American forests. Once here, they have rapidly expanded their ranges.


    The larvae of the emerald ash borer devastate trees across the U.S.

    While all 50 states have been attacked by pests, experts say forests in the Northeast, California, Colorado and parts of the Midwest, North Carolina and Florida are especially at risk. Forests in some states, like New York, are close to major trade routes, while others, like in Florida, house trees especially susceptible to pests. Others, like New Hampshire, Massachusetts and Maine, are experiencing record warming. “The primary driver of the invasive pest problem is globalization, which includes increased trade and travel,” Andrew Liebhold, a Forest Service research entomologist in West Virginia. “But there are cases where climate change can play an important role. As climates warm, species are able to survive and thrive in more northerly areas.”

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    Last edited by waltky; Dec 07 2016 at 09:17 PM.

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