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Thread: Post vids and websites that explain scientific terms

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panzerkampfwagen View Post

    Eugenie Scott explaining what fact, hypothesis, theory and law means in science.

    Thought I'd put it up since so many people on this website *cough* the religious *cough* are always trying to argue that scientific theories are just guesses and are waiting to be proven to become law.
    tell the wingnuts to go lay by their dish

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/hframe.html

    for the basics

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishmatter View Post
    Stop saying that. It's like saying that because there are hundreds of thousands of criminals in America we are a criminal country. In fact we have a system set up here that for the most part encourages people not behave criminally, despite the acts of a few. If you're going to condemns science because it's done by people then everything is rotten to the core. But if you pay some attention you'll see that the only catastrophic losses in knowledge or wholesale rejection of truths we now understand were always true comes not from science but from religion. The world is equally not the center of the universe today as when people were killing for saying so. And every single time some overhyped controversy erupts because someone fudged some data or took grant money despite know research would be fruitless it woud be wise to look further into each and every story and ask "who uncovered the shenanigans?"

    Scientists. Always scientists. Never the people who feign outrage over naturalism moral inferiority to the good book. When a scientist uncovers fraud he's not letting down science by going public, he's making science better and more accurate. But whenever someone starts to make noise about the illegitimacy of science scratch the surface and I guarantee you that person holds superstitious beliefs that are the opposite of rational or scientific.

    These people have an agenda. They want to diminish the respect science has and lower it to the level of alchemy because they are not interested in truth. Truth is the thing they're most afraid of, and reason, and evidence, and especially the idea that even asking those kinds of questions is something any decent person would consider.

    Get rid of science maybe nobody will think to ask for evidence, or want to believe in things because of the evidence, not in spite of its lack. Teach enough people that asking questions is wrong and these lunatics might have a chance.

    The only query these folks can get behind is an inquisition.
    Well stated!

    This thread should be made a sticky so we can refer to it whenever anyone responds with "It's only a theory"!; or gives examples of iron rusting as a "proven" theory.
    1. The Scientific debate remains open. Voters believe that there is no consensus about global warming within the scientific community. Should the public come to believe that the scientific issues are settled, their views about global warming will change accordingly. Therefore, you need to continue to make the lack of scientific certainty a primary issue in the debate, and defer to scientists and other experts in the field.--Luntz Research

  4. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MannieD View Post
    Well stated!

    This thread should be made a sticky so we can refer to it whenever anyone responds with "It's only a theory"!; or gives examples of iron rusting as a "proven" theory.
    Thanks. I wish I hadn't typed it on an iPhone in the back of a cab, though. Between the missed words, dropped letters and other typos it's a little hard to take what I said very seriously.

    (edit) ...aaaaand it's too late to edit it, apparently. I don't know what to say except that I'd had a few ales.
    Last edited by fishmatter; Apr 20 2012 at 12:52 PM.
    I have the body of an 18 year old. I keep it in the fridge.

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  5. #14

    Default A must-see/hear history of 20th century technology

    This one is amazing. Freeman Dyson, a physicist-elder-statesman who worked on a wide range of seminal projects across different fields, from quantum electrodynamics to biology to the SETI project. Here, he gives an utterly charming and highly informative lecture about having lived through 4 different revolutions: Space Technology, Nuclear Energy, the Genome and the Computer Revolution.

    The site doesn't seem to support embedding here.

    Here's a link to the audio podcast version which is equally enjoyable - the video doesn't feature any graphics so it works fine in audio only.

    itunes podcast audio link
    I have the body of an 18 year old. I keep it in the fridge.

    spike milligan

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