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Thread: I saw it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Foolardi View Post
    It's kinda like saying ... The Sun went down.The Sun does not go down.
    The Earth rotates on it's axis and moves the plane of the earth towards or
    away from the sun.
    Yes, or, "the stars are out tonight".

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    Quote Originally Posted by tecoyah View Post
    Imagine trying to see car headlights from 10 miles away on a clear might and a flat surface.
    Now...20 miles, 40 miles.....then 100 miles.

    Highly unlikely you can see it, even if using a telescope and knowing exactly where it is.
    Quite true. But then, unfiltered sunlight striking a silver object, (which satellites mostly are), is going to reflect very vividly to an observer. Especially since that reflected light is set against a backdrop of black space.

    I'm pretty confident that what I saw really was Sputnik. Because, (a) we were alerted by radio that the satellite would be passing overhead at a specific time and in a specific direction; (b) it was around 1957, before there were jet airliners travelling at very high altitudes in Australia; (c) we were located far from a major city, in a coastal township which was barely developed then; (d) it was a very clear, still night without clouds, and we were allowed to lie outside on the grass for quite a while, waiting.

    When it appeared, (or rather, when we spotted it), it was a tiny point of white light, moving from horizon to horizon, without the slightest deviation. We had to continually "recapture" it, because it looked like a small pale star. There was absolutely no aeroplane sound, which we were quite accustomed to hearing whenever a plane went overhead, (props, not jets). It was also a topic of conversation at school for some time after that.

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